MAY CONTAIN NUTS
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • POUR IT ON: WWII POSTER

Webb and Mother

Webb and Mother

John Wilson Webb, in Pittsburgh, weighs 120 lbs at 34 months. April 17, 1909. From the George Grantham Bain Collection. View full size.

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120 lbs?

Wow, she held him when he was 120 lbs. Oh my... I guess back then, they all were so used to carry heavier loads than us.

Not an easy path

He probably had something called Prader-Willi Syndrome, it's a condition that makes kids get very big (there isn't a mechanism in their brain chemistry that tells them they are full, and they are just large people because of the syndrome, built with a very square heavy build and a large head), they are often developmentally delayed, and aggressive or violent. It isn't easy being the parent of a Prader-Willi kid, my heart goes out to the mom...particularly since it wouldn't have been recognized as a specific chromosomal abnormality at that point.

Mom's Chin

"A.) He has his mother's chin."

Yeah, both of them!

A.) He has his mother's

A.) He has his mother's chin.

B.) In the picture on the right he looks like he was considering the possibility of eating the camera man! Luckily I think you could outrun him.

The Kid.

The kid is two and he could be a bouncer in a bar!

fast food

I didn't think McDonalds was around back then. How strange.

uncommon?

I am assuming that the kids size was fairly uncommon at that time? Unfortunately, this day and age you see this all too often.

Weight-Lifting Momma

Man, Mom's gotta have a strong back--my 3 year old weighs less than thirty pounds and even she gets heavy after awhile. I can't imagine lugging this little bouncing baby boy around.

You got THAT right! Three or

You got THAT right! Three or four at LEAST!

Feh.

I see three or four of these kids every day now.

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