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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • WE CAN DO IT! BUT FIRST, COFFEE

Snowliner: 1943

Snowliner: 1943

January 1943. "Chicago Union Station. Streamliner 'Hiawatha' ready to depart the Chicago, Milwaukee, Saint Paul & Pacific platform on the north side of the station." Photo by Jack Delano, Office of War Information. View full size.

 

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Beautiful image. Excellent print

This one jumped out at me and I had to have a print. The print arrived today and it's gorgeous. Nice to have a little bit of the romance of days gone by on the walls! Thanks Shorpy

Wrong year

This is clearly a photo from the future: that's a Replicant on the platform.

Romance of the Rails.

Great photo. Evokes visions of comfortable travel with wonderful service. One of the 'good old days' memories that really lived up to its billing. Hard to imagine traveling like that anywhere in America today. Pity.

Who needs color photography?

When black and white is so much more subtle and evocative.

A rare rainy day

in Chicago in January.

Afternoon Hi

I recall seeing these wonderful monsters thundering out of town as a young lad in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the early forties. My uncle, a Milwaukee Road hoghead, would take me over to State Street to watch the trains pass after they pounded through the Grand Avenue interlocking. Even within city limits they wasted no time. Those were very special times. The Hiawatha’s were designed by industrial designer Otto Kuhler, who had numerous locomotive designs to his credit. “The Hiawatha Story,” by Jim Scrbbins, features photographs of grade crossing signs in Wisconsin that warned motorists that trains pass in excess of 100 MPH. Those were the days my friend.
Attached is a variant of the power on the Hiawatha from the period.

Film Noir

This is a stunningly beautiful photograph! Jack Delano's choice of a rainy day was inspired.

Snowing

Great shot, Milw RR beaver tail obs and what looks like a full dome car ahead.

Hiawatha redux?

Isn't this our second view of the Hiawatha? I seem to remember a photo from a couple of years ago or so. Wish I was aboard right now.

[It's here. -tterrace

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