MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JENNY ON THE JOB LIFTS WEIGHT THE EASY WAY

Lucky Pups: 1938

Lucky Pups: 1938

November 1938. "Shafter Camp for migrants, California. Cotton picker's children who live in a tent in the government camp instead of along the highway or in a ditch." Photo by Dorothea Lange, Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Cannot look away

Those faces are so sweet, with no trace of self-pity for their poverty. Just innocent boys loving some puppies. They are so darn cute!! I hope their lives were good to them.

Spit Bath

I wonder what the boys ate that remains on their faces? Berries? Whatever it was, the puppy doesn't seem to mind clean up duty.

Carefree time for little ones

These look like happy children! If their parents shielded them from the fact that they were very poor, they probably thought living in a tent was great fun, as long as they had something to eat!

My mother's family never had to live in a tent, but they had to live with Grandpa's parents during the Depression. Since they were farmers, they never went hungry, but they had very little in the way of material possessions. Mom, who was born in 1929, says she only remembers it being a very happy time.

Cute, and likely smart, too

They look like border collies, or at least partly so. Wonderful dogs, if you can keep their minds occupied.

Too cute.

Anyone with the audacity to devalue the relationship between humans and dogs ought to be made to study this photograph very carefully.

It's the . . .

oxytocin. And it works both ways, on the humans and the dogs - sometimes described as "The hormone of love and cuddle".

Lickee

Previously seen here.

Affection

Unconditional love from puppies kissing your face, snuggling close to your heart and seeking your acceptance can melt away adversity, at least for a while.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.