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Lost Dog: 1939

Lost Dog: 1939

October 1939. "On U.S. 99 as it continues through Oregon. Lane County, Williamette Valley." Back in the day, this doggy sandwich stand was quite fetching. Photo by Dorothea Lange for the Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

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Waymarked

The location was Cottage Grove, Oregon. The local library has a file on the stand stating that it was built in 1930, and it also had the following information.

"It weighs approximately two ton and rests on a 6 foot by 13 foot platform. It is 11 feet high and the body of the dog is 18 feet long. It is designed to be equipped with electric refrigeration and electric stove".

"George Ballew had charge of the construction work, it was wired by the Nelson Electric Shop, was Painted by Ren Sanford and has been photographed by the Shields studio".

The former site is waymarked here.

The history is also documented on this website with even a photo of the stand being transported on the back of a truck.

Reward Poster

My father, then a Western Pacific Special Agent in Elko, was part of the investigation. The case was never solved.

http://www.outbacknevada.us/hickson/CitySF.html

Reward Poster

This looks like the Southern Pacific reward poster issued to try to find the people responsible for the derailment & wreck of the "City of San Francisco" train.

Reward??

I wonder what that $5,000 Reward posting beneath the dog's head was all about. That was an incredible amount of money in those days.

Eclectic Architecture

A lost part of Americana. Strange and wonderful roadside diners and shops designed to lure the wayward tourist into pausing in their travels. This place obviously went to the dogs; wonder what happened to it. Probably turned into pup tents.

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