MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JENNY ON THE JOB LIFTS WEIGHT THE EASY WAY

Church Street: 1911

Church Street: 1911

Burlington, Vermont, circa 1911. "Church Street north from Bank Street." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Leunig's location

We lived in South Burlington, VT for almost 30 years. Leunigs actually was at the corner of Church and College Streets.

Church St. revisited..

As a former resident, I found this particular photo quite enlightening. I worked at several bistros and bars on this street in the 80-90's, Leunig's in particular on the corner of Bank and Church. But the details here are incredible by use of the enlargement to pan in and out. So what is the deal with he ornamental light-right upper on the pulley system for lowering/raising? Oil-kerosene? Pretty unique as is the unknown trolley system, wow. Thanks Shorpy, will be ordering a few of these to take back to Vermont. Cheers! PS, more Vermont pics please??? Chips Hanson/Stowe

[Carbon arc lamp. -tterrace]

Great photo

I already posted but this photo is packed with great detail of the Edwardian period of transition from old to modern --the stately matron on the left, but a frisky young girl running up the street (kids will always be kids; timeless) --the blocks of ice in the back of the ice wagon, --the quiet but powerful Stanley Steamer with the well dressed lady waiting patiently in the back seat (a "lady" would never drive) while we know that the Stanley had the pilot-light keeping the steam pressure up; starting a Stanley from cold was a 20-minute process
--the streetcar conductor oozes presence and confidence
--the streetlight-on-pulley to lower for maintenance. Too cool.

Stanley Steamer

Yippee!!! Too cool, the Stanley Steamer sitting at the curb definitely dates the photo before 1915; the Stanley was a pretty unusual sight even back then.

[There's no reason an elderly Steamer couldn't be parked at the curb any time after 1915, unless they suddenly dematerialized when they got to be a few years old. - Dave]

You are sure

this scene is from Down East by the Moxie sign on the store to the left.

Not Sure

What the heck is corset parlor?

Stanley Steamer

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that is a 1909 Stanley parked at the curb.

Street lights in the rain

Anyone know how they kept the street lights working in rain? Looks like the connections weren't real weatherproof.

Anyone here?

Sometimes these pedestrian malls kill commerce in a downtown. Customers can't park near stores, or something to that effect. It happened in the 1980s in Eugene, Oregon, I know. By the time we moved, they had begun to reopen the streets to traffic.

Where's the pool table?

Those knickerbockers look like they're buckled BELOW the knee!

Sunday, Sept. 3

The day of the Eagles excursion to Montreal. The LOC database dates the photo between 1910 and 1920. That would be either 1911 or 1916. Hence, I suppose, Dave’s “circa” in the caption.

Same scene today

Church Street is a pedestrian mall.


View Larger Map

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.