MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BRITISH COLUMBIA VACATION-LAND: 1950s

To the Republic: 1942

To the Republic: 1942

May 1942. "Southington, Connecticut. Schoolchildren pledging allegiance to the flag." Photo by Fenno Jacobs for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

My old school

Several other photos taken in Southington, by Fenno Jacobs, during his May, 1942 visit, of a flag-raising, and of school-kids using this salute, were clearly taken on the modest north lawn of the Milldale School, (1922-c.1995), in the south-central end of town. This school was located at the junction of Clark, Norton & S. Main Streets.

My own very first school recess was conducted on the same spot, in Sept., 1954. First Graders, we joined hands in performing the old round "Did You Ever See a Lassie." At that time, a large addition was being built onto the school, and the flagpole had been moved to a different spot.

This is the exact location in the Jacobs photo, (the kids were on the left side, in front of the windows), this taken in April, 1995, shortly before the place was demolished. I have been told that the clock was saved.

Everybody wave

Look! It's Richard Stands!

Pledging allegiance

About a month ago, I was fortunate enough to be a guest at an elementary school assembly in Chihuahua, Mexico. There, a young child stood in front of the Mexican flag and extended her hand, palm down, slightly upraised. She began the pledge and her classmates did as she did, and pledged,too. It was altogether touching, once I got over the initial surprise.

I thought this was taken in 1942 Germany.

I have never seen anyone in the USA performing such a salute while saying the Pledge of Allegiance, and I'm nearly sixty. I have only seen Americans putting their right hands over their hearts when saying the Pledge.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.