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Third Street Presbyterian: 1902

Third Street Presbyterian: 1902

Dayton, Ohio, circa 1902. "Third Street Presbyterian Church." Scrolling top to bottom in Full Size mode, you get a nice visual allegory: Heaven to Earthy. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Amen

You could say the congregation got the point!

The street light

It looks like a pulley system for servicing the street light in the middle of the intersection. I never noticed them in other Shorpy pictures. Did they actually require that much maintenance to need pulleys?

[Carbon arc lamps required frequent maintenance - trimming, adjusting and replacement of the rods. -tterrace]

What Were They Thinking?

A) This congregation really needs more lightning strikes to go with our fire and brimstone service.

B) If you want to have bats in the belfry, you want to give them a whole lot of nesting space.

C)If the Hindenburg comes to Dayton we need some place to tie it.

D) If you don't put enough money in our collection plate every Sunday, we make you go up and clean the roof at the end of the year.

Alas this spectacle of architectural excess was torn down and replaced in the 1920's. I would have liked to see a current picture of it, but it no longer exists.

Sic Transit...

to one super lightning rod:
"The Westminster Church was erected at Third and Ludlow Streets in 1881. It was razed in 1924 and the Westminster Building was built on the site. The chapel was built in 1874. The new church was erected at First and Wilkinson Streets."

Very

inspiring.

Edifice Complex

Our spire is bigger than your spire.

Maybe they just want their church to be closer to heaven.

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