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Here Today: 1947

Here Today: 1947

        Here Today -- The car they said was years away!

New York City, December 1947. "Hudson dealers and the new Hudson." A striking design that sold like hotcakes when it was introduced to car-starved postwar America. 4x5 inch acetate negative by John M. Fox. View full size.

 

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Gone Tomorrow

There is something poignant about this picture of executives presenting what was sure to be a major hit and quickly bring Hudson back to success. Sadly a future merger with Nash-Kelvinator would not save the Hudson name. However the resulting feisty American Motors bought Jeep and brought us the Pacer and Gremlin before disappearing into what is now Fiat-Chrysler.

Fussy

The Hudson appeal seems to grow as the years go by. At the time its styling was not as well-received as the cleaner, less fussy, offerings from Packard like this 1948 model I owned.

Hudson Couldn't Catch a Break

The "stepdown" design, though attractive to some, was of unibody rather than body-on-chassis construction. That made all but minor cosmetic updates a matter of comprehensive re-tooling, a very expensive undertaking for a "major-minor" manufacturer.

Together with the sales disaster that was the smaller Hudson Jet, Hudson's fiscal inability to match the Big Three in restyling frequency finally led to a financial failure only temporarily remediated by merging with Nash to form what became American Motor Company. By 1958, AMC was producing only Ramblers ...; oh, and the Anglo-American Metropolitan.

Breaking News

Full break, full break, full break, no break, no break, moderate break. It's all personal preference.

I love the doublebreasted pinstripe

But the guy needs to get his trousers properly hemmed, or tighten up his suspenders a bit.

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