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Acapulco: 1961

Acapulco: 1961

"Acapulco, 1961." James Coburn, Ralph Taeger and three curvaceous castmates in faux-Mexico, from the very short-lived (eight episodes) NBC-TV series. 4x5 inch acetate negative from the Shorpy Publicity Department archive. View full size.

 

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Suburban Calypso

When I was a kid in Virginia in the '60s, we called those hats "bug hats" and wore them to do yard work. The fronds sticking out were supposed to keep insects away from your face.

Acapulco in the '60s.

We stayed at the Acapulco Hilton in 1965 (Thanks to Elvis's "Fun In Acapulco" movie). Rented a car and drove all around. Took a city bus at 1 a.m. Drove to Mexico City. It's sad but I would never do any of that today. Good memories of the good old days.

Our Man Flint!

Like Austin Powers, In Like Flint was my favorite movie. I can still hear the crazy Z.O.W.I.E. Telephone ring.

Gender inequity

With rare exceptions, women had to be pretty to make it in showbiz. There were plenty of hunky guys in the pictures and on TV, but James Coburn proved that a man could look like a toad and still make it.

Calypso, not hillbilly

That hat is more associated with the calypso fad than Dogpatch, USA. That's from a former folksinger back in the day ("Day-Oh! He say Day-Oh!") who grew up in environs that were similar in demographics to Dogpatch.

Fashion foible

Although the girls are gorgeous, James Coburn seems to be wearing an ascot (to the beach) and I can't believe someone brought along that silly, hillbilly, corny, straw hat as sold at Dogpatch USA in the Ozarks before it went out of business. I recall Lana Turner at a Hollywood pool wearing a similar one in a photo you published previously. I guess fads come and go but it sure looks a bit tacky these days.

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