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Femmes Fatales: 1920

Femmes Fatales: 1920

San Francisco, 1920. "Haynes four-passenger coupe." Conveying two huntresses stalking small game. 8x6 glass negative by Christopher Helin. View full size.

 

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What Mr. Haynes didn't know about automobiles ...

Messrs. Apperson did -- until those brothers ended the six-year collaboration, Haynes-Apperson Automobile Co., by leaving in 1901 to make cars under their own name, that is. Haynes soldiered on alone for another 20 years in Kokomo, offering graceful and elegant cars of excellent quality, though at a substantial price.

All three gentlemen are widely regarded as distinguished pioneers by cognoscenti of automotive history, but their name-recognition quotient among the general population in the second decade of the 21st century is virtually nil.

Stowe Lake

The hill in the background is Mt Sutro (donated to the city by mayor Adolf Sutro) and the building on it is the Affiliated Colleges (the future UCSF).

"James, take me to the opera."

This body style was known as an "Opera Coupe." It looks like she's sitting in the back seat because there was a long seat across the back and a small single seat up front for the driver (usually with a folding jump-seat beside him that could stow forward against the firewall.) In formal dress m'lady would sit in back and her long formal opera dress would lay across the floor beside the driver and not get wrinkled.

I'm still amazed

at the actual size of these early behemoths, try getting this into your present day garage.

Don't make any sudden moves --

There's a weasel crawling on your neck, Blanche!!

Vampmobile

Even the mink on the shoulder looks frisky.

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