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Four No Trump: 1943

Four No Trump: 1943

January 1943. "Washington, D.C. After dinner a bridge game goes on nightly in the largest room in the boardinghouse." Medium format nitrate negative by Esther Bubley for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

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Just call me Columbo

This may be "the largest room in the boardinghouse" but I think it is a bedroom for many reasons. First, the foot of the bed covered with a bedspread is very noticeable behind the man on the left. Second, the chest of drawers has a jar of cosmetic cream near the soldier's picture and the shelf behind that has an electric iron on top, both usually kept in a bedroom, while the mirror flanked by two light sconces seems to be a vanity-type mirror used in bedrooms. Even the curtains and shades look more like bedroom curtains. If this is the largest room in the house, one has to wonder how cramped the rest of the house is. I also notice that the lady in the knitted hat must be sitting on a footstool to be so short and no two chairs are alike. My mama didn't raise no fool.

[She's sitting in an easy chair. -tterrace]

[The "rooms" in a boardinghouse are all bedrooms. - Dave]

Not a Matching Set

I can't help but notice that each person at the card table is seated in their own unique type of chair. The players also don't have very good poker faces.

Is it bedtime yet?

They may want to switch games. It appears from this photo that bridge isn't much fun.

Call me old fashioned

I think one of the gents should have given his chair to the lady on the left. She can't be enjoying the game with her chin a few inches above the tabletop.

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