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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE ALASKA, c. 1920s

Small Government: 1937

Small Government: 1937

September 1937. "Town clerk's office. Hyde Park, Vermont." Photo by Arthur Rothstein for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Some Words Of Prevention.

Never ever pile your cord wood against any wooden structure since it's an open invitation for a pregnant termite queen to start a new colony. Even if she passes there are other destructive insects who would love to use this as an entry into your house.

Pile it away from the house on a steel plate or a solid concrete surface with driven steel rods as place holders for your wood. You may have to walk further for your wood but at least your great grandchildren will have a house to live in.

And across the street, the Chicken Inn

Whoa, talk about déjà vu. When I clicked in the Google Maps view, I saw a large red wooden building across the street and down the block, currently the Philip Edwards furniture store. I knew I'd seen that here before, in the comments for a picture that featured it in an earlier time. Sure enough, it was the Chicken Inn, photographed during the same Rothstein visit.

A B-run House

For all the Tegu theatre is a small-town show, its bills are pretty current. For their grand opening they booked Walter Wanger's Vogues of 1938 (Warner Baxter, Joan Bennett), and the next week they feature Public Cowboy No. 1 (Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, Ann Rutherford), Stella Dallas (Barbara Stanwyck, John Boles, Anne Shirley), and Call of the Wild (Clark Gable, Loretta Young, Jack Oakie). Of all those, only Call of the Wild is a back-catalogue release (1935). I'm kinda impressed.

What's in the window?

Looks like something very similar to the attached.

From public service to private

and still there, too!

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