MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • BRITISH COLUMBIA VACATION-LAND: 1950s

Never Excelled: 1939

Never Excelled: 1939

June 1939. "Old livery stable in Virginia City, Montana." Medium format negative by Arthur Rothstein for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Never Excelled But In Color

     The Hyde Park beer brand was a major player in the early 1900s prior to prohibition and again after prohibition for many years. In the 1940’s they hit their zenith of sales and immediately started to lose market share to Anheuser-Busch and Griesedieck Bros breweries.
    In the 1950s on their 75th year anniversary the brewery introduced Hyde Park 75 to try to secure some new market share with female drinkers, but after a few years, the brand was not a huge hit, and the brewery was sold. Shortly after the purchase the Hyde Park brand was eliminated once and for all.


    Hike, Pete and Sam Siebrand owned one of the largest combined circus and carnivals in the north and southwest.
    In the beginning the Siebrands were farmers and never dreamed that they soon would be in show business. More


    In 1938 the co-owned Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Combined Shows was experiencing labor problems which ultimately led to the circus being closed after performances in Scranton, Pennsylvania on June 22.[5] After regrouping at the circus winter quarters in Sarasota, Florida the Ringling-Barnum circus trains were dispatched to Redfield, South Dakota where the two circuses met and were combined into a yet larger circus featuring many of the major stars from Ringling-Barnum. The circus toured from July 11 until November 27, 1938 as "Al G. Barnes and Sells-Floto Circus Presenting Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Stupendous New Features. More


    Wonder what is the Guinness world record for coughs in a carload?


Negative Space

A clever advertising hook is shown in that many of the adverts on the left are mimicked on the right.

The big main door is suspended from a sliding rail above, so when opened the commercial message would still show, and when closed gave a double-down.

Notice some of the bills on the right side are torn horizontally, caught by a spur on the door as it slide by.

The three no doubt fragrant piles suggest that business was still being done here.

Need A Good Horse ... Cheap?

Government records indicate Johanson Livery Company of Virginia City formed on March 5, 1910 and was dissolved in 1950. The photo indicates that business may not have been booming sometime well before that year. The Siebrand Brothers Circus lasted a longer spell, from the late 19th century well into the 1960s, with their traveling show and carnival. The brothers hailed from Northwood, North Dakota. No word on whether the show wintered there.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2019 Shorpy Inc.