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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • RAINIER NATIONAL PARK: c. 1920s

Hunter's Drug Store: 1939

Hunter's Drug Store: 1939

Spring 1939. "General scene, main street. Greensboro, Greene County, Georgia." Medium format negative by Marion Post Wolcott for the Farm Security Administration. View full size.

 

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Candidate for the "Pretty Girls" Genre

Dave, with your addition of the image of Marion Post Wolcott to the comment in this thread I think you should add any images of her that you have to your "Pretty Girls" category.

What Catches My Eye

Is not the beautiful and gaudy Coca-Cola sign, but the old-fashioned (for 1939) sign for "postal telegraph and commercial cables". That's probably from 1910 or so, judging by the font and the slightly dated language.

I have a bit of a crush

... on the lovely Miss Wolcott.

Cover your face, This little boy is the wrong race

I certainly wonder why they covered their faces when they saw a cameraman. I can't help but think that someone would be really upset in the white kids family to see him hanging out with a/this black family, and they were worried about possible violence against themselves for being friends? I'm not sure at all, but this has me pondering the photo for sure. Not often in Shorpy images do "I" see people covering their faces, much less B&W mingling in 1939 Georgia. I would also guess that if this photo happened to circulate thru town at this time... They would be discovered, For sure. Sad times indeed, in Many ways during this period in history, for some families Others, not so much.

[You are laboring under a number of misconceptions, not the least of which is that people with cameras are "cameramen" -- they are photographers. And Miss Wolcott is not a man. And ... - Dave]

Lost the Coke ad, sadly

Lost the benches, too, but it did gain a window.

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