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The Cherry Pickers: 1940

The Cherry Pickers: 1940

July 1940. "Migrant fruit worker and sons living in rear of truck during cherry picking season. Berrien County, Michigan." Medium format negative by John Vachon. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

The Mounds Bar

During WWII Peter Paul was almost exclusively producing Mounds for the army, instead of civilians. Because the United States military regarded chocolate as both a morale boost and high-energy treat for personnel, Peter Paul was supplying 5 million Mounds bars to the U.S. army during WWII. That's why the Naugatuck Daily News in july, 1945 wrote: "German General Found With Peter Paul Mounds.”

Read the story "How Armenian Immigrants Built an American Candy Empire."

Dismal

This is one of the saddest pictures on Shorpy. The cramped space, the unsmiling faces all around, the two tiny beds. The bruise on the face of the boy with the eye squint. The father’s long, unfocussed gaze. And where’s Mom?

The concept of family

This was still at a time when the concept of family went beyond your station in life. Getting married meant raising children and continuing the heritage that you inherited.

Today people not only need a reason to marry, they need to plan children as they would buying a house. We have been taught, 'if you can't afford them. don't have them', and yet the standard for being able to afford children continues to climb. These people's priorities would seem backward to many 'enlightened' people of our time.

But I see brave, hardworking people who want to raise offspring that will learn the same kind of values, and carry on what made this country great to begin with.

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