MAY CONTAIN NUTS
SHORPY
HOME
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • YOUR COURAGE WILL BRING US VICTORY
 

Shorpy members who are Patreon contributors get an ad-free experience! (Mostly -- there's still an ad above the comments.) Sign up or learn more.

Women Welders: 1943

Women Welders: 1943

June 1943. "New Britain, Connecticut. Women welders at the Landers, Frary, and Clark plant." Acetate negative by Gordon Parks for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Reminds me of that old Soviet joke.

Where a guy working in a sewing machine factory wanting to have a sewing machine for his wife's birthday. But no way to get one in the shops. Then trying to get one by smuggling them out of the factory one part at a time and assembling them at home. Three times. And every time ending up with a machine gun.

Pretty Girls tag

They are certainly pretty enough. Not to mention animated and spirited.

That must have been one sturdy toaster

if it required welding. During WW2, Landers, Frary and Clark made everything from vacuum bottles to mess kits to gun mounts.

Toaster!

My goodness. We had one of those toasters when I was a kid. Got to be very careful and watch closely or that toast will burn to a crisp. No smoke detectors then either. Fun memories.

Prior to their War Work

Landers, Frary & Clark, (commonly referred to as "Landers," by collectors,) was a major maker of kitchen appliances, which they marketed under the "UNIVERSAL" brand. Their hand-cranked meat grinders seem to have sold by the million! I recall seeing their old buildings being torn down in the 1960's.

A toast to Victory

I have a toaster made by Landers, Frary & Clark. I bought it a flea market some 25 years ago. The nameplate says UNIVERSAL (The Trade Mark Known In Every Home). I'm guessing it's nearly a century old. Once every few years, I take it down off the shelf and make some toast. An M45 machine gun mount it ain't.

Syndicate content  Shorpy.com is a vintage photography site featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago. Contact us | Privacy policy | Site © 2021 Shorpy Inc.