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Three Reels Five Cents

Three Reels Five Cents

Washington, D.C. "Moore's Garden Theatre." Playing to-day: "The Invaders," a noteworthy Western made in 1912. National Photo Co. View full size.

 

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Plot

Sounds like a good movie. According to the Internet Movie Database (imdb.com):

"The U.S. Army and the Indians sign a peace treaty. However, a group of surveyors trespass on the Indians' land and violate the treaty. The army refuses to listen to the Indians' complaints, and the surveyors are killed by the Indians. A vicious Indian war ensues, culminating in an Indian attack on an army fort."

Watch the movie....

It came to this. . . .

Sad last days.

By any other name

This theater had four names during its history:
Imperial Theatre 1911
Moore's Garden Theatre 1913
Central Theatre 1922
Gayety Theatre 1950-1973

The Gayety

Worked this theatre several times in 1971 or 1972 as the Gayety.. Projection room was behind the small door (above the word Garden), when I was there the large window and door had been replaced by a wall with a window on each side, the windows were on the floor. The door pictured would have been a little over 4ft tall, note knob. It was located at the back of the projection booth. The booth hund from the ceiling and was accessed by an open ladder up the back wall of the baclony.

The three sash windows on each side (over the words Moore's and Theatre) were filled in when I worked there. There was a huge restroom on each side of the booth (but almost a floor lower) these three windows may have been high in the restroom wall.

Here is a picture of the Gayety when I knew it..

Between Moores and the Gayety this theatre was the Warner Bros Central, a grand jewel of 9th Street.

That's "Moore" like it!!

When I saw the first photo, the tight shot of the box office, I was struck by how plain the theatre seemed to be compared to others we've seen from the same general era. This photo shows the building in all its lost glory. Too bad it's gone!

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