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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • VINTAGE MIAMI: c. 1960s

So Inclined: 1904

So Inclined: 1904

Cincinnati, Ohio, circa 1904. "Inclined plane." Five "Cincinnati incline" railway elevators served the growing hillside suburbs above the smoky basin below. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

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Oh, I don't think so!

Think I'd rather walk!!

Cincy Streetcars

Another interesting detail: Note the twin trolley poles on the streetcars. This was unique to Cincinnati (and one or two other systems), as most streetcars used the overhead wire for 600VDC positive and the rail for the return. In Cincy's case, they decided to string an extra wire (concerns about galvanization caused by current running through the ground rails or some such, if memory serves.)

Bellevue House

This is the Bellevue Incline, built in 1876 and closed in 1926. The ruins at the top of the hill are the remains of the Bellevue House, a resort that burned in 1901. Cincinnati had a total of five inclined railways, which were unusual because all but one (the Price Hill Incline) were designed to accommodate streetcars as well as wagons and foot passengers.

Bellevue Incline

This is the Bellevue Incline running over Clifton Avenue. The angled stone support seen in the photo is still visible right out on Clifton as you go down the hill. The ruins at the top are of the old Bellevue House, a beer garden at the end of Ohio Avenue. Today Bellevue Park is at the top of the hill. When I was a student at UC if you found the break in the chain link fence around the park you could walk right out to the edge of the cliff seen at the top of the photo, and the views of the Ohio and Mill Creek valleys were incredible. Just don't fall!


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Cincy Inclines

Two nice pages here and here.

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