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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • POUR IT ON: WWII POSTER

Pensacola: 1904

Pensacola: 1904

Pensacola, Florida, circa 1904. "Opera House and American National Bank." An interesting assortment of street furniture and electrical gear. 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Something Old

This is my hometown and I find it beautiful!

Dating by poster

There was a Monday, March 16 in 1903.

Going Up

I love that there are footholds on the telephone pole that start at the ground and go all the way up to the business end. I'm sure these weren't a temptation for any of the kids in the neighborhood.

The final curtain

Pensacola is one of my favorite beach towns, because it is quite old and has a lot of great surviving structures.

Sadly, this isn't one of them:
http://www.pensapedia.com/wiki/Pensacola_Opera_House

I haven't been since the last big hurricane moved its way through the Panhandle. I know that a few places I loved dearly took heavy damage, and I just haven't been able to stand to look.

Old Glory

Interesting use for an old cannon, keeping wagons and carriages out of the gutter. I guess it's keeping the equally disgraced gas lamp company, now that the new arc lamp has risen to notoriety.

Repurposed

I've heard of beating swords into plowshares, but I've never seen howitzers turned into bollards. Perhaps we could revive this concept. Installing artillery at intersections might remind people to be civil.

Perchance ...

The Addams Family Bank?

Like peanut butter and jam

High class and high finance together at last!

"Foxy Quiller"

Recycled Cannon

Looks like an old cannon stuck business-end down in the street corner.
Did you ever notice that in these old photos none of the bicycles are locked ?
At what point did bicycle theft make its appearance, I wonder ?

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