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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • NATIONAL PARK POSTERS

Win: 1896

Win: 1896

Circa 1896. "Mercer, baseball." George Barclay "Win" Mercer (1874-1903). Glass negative from the C.M. Bell portrait studio in Washington, D.C. View full size.

MERCER'S TRAGIC END

Ball Player Takes Own Life in San Francisco.

        SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 13 -- Winnie D. Mercer, a pitcher for the American baseball team, registered at the Occidental Hotel last evening and was found asphyxiated in his room to-day. Mercer was registered under the name of George Murray and gave his residence as Philadelphia. The watchman of the hotel in making his rounds detected the odor of gas coming from Mercer's room, and, failing to receive a response to his knocking, broke down the door. Clad in his night clothes and lying in the bed with his coat and vest covering his head, Mercer was found. From the gas jet in the center of the room was suspended a rubber tube, and the end of this Mercer had placed in his mouth, after turning the gas full on.

        Mercer's identity was established by papers found among his effects, one of which read: "Tell Mr. Van Horn, of the Langham Hotel, that Winnie Mercer has taken his life." He also left letters, one to his mother and another to a young lady of East Liverpool, Ohio, expressing regret over his deed and bidding them fond farewells. He left a statement of his financial accounts addressed to Tip O'Neill, and advised his friends to avoid games of chance and women.

-- Washington Post, January 14, 1903.

 

Warren Peace: 1921

Warren Peace: 1921

        During the week of July 21-27, 1921, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone camped at a site about six miles east of Hancock in Washington County, Maryland. During the weekend, President Warren G. Harding joined the “vagabonds” — the name the wealthy industrialists gave themselves when they camped together. The 200-acre farm where they made camp was located about one mile north of the National Turnpike along Licking Creek. Today, the campsite lies inside Camp Harding County Park. A plaque memorializes the gathering of these famous campers.

July 1921. "Warren Harding at Firestone camp." The president with industrialist Harvey Firestone and the inventor Thomas Edison (napping). Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Garden Spots: 1951

Garden Spots: 1951

"Sally in garden -- 18 Sept 1951." From Blue Earth, Minnesota, our latest Kodachrome by Grace or Hubert Tuttle. View full size.

 

The Chamber: 195x

The Chamber: 195x

From the Library of Congress archive comes this orphan image, circa 1953, with no caption or other identifying information. What could this young man who looks like one of Captain Video's ranger cadets be up to? View full size.

 

Dance Palace: 1942

Dance Palace: 1942

April 1942. "Hollywood, California. Sign and ticket window of a large dance palace." The Hollywood Palladium on Sunset Boulevard. Medium format nitrate negative by Russell Lee for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

The New Hotel: 1908

The New Hotel: 1908

        ROCHESTER, Sept. 13 — Rochester’s new hotel, the Seneca, will be opened tomorrow in time for the State Democratic Convention, which meets here Tuesday. The hostelry in size will compare with the Hotel Astor in New York. Its architecture is in a general way French Renaissance. It is constructed of brick of brownish hue, trimmed with gray terra-cotta.

        The hotel has a frontage of 130 feet on Clinton Avenue, and is only a couple of blocks from the city’s Convention Hall. It runs back 200 feet to Cortland Street, and along the side has the advantage of a private roadway 30 feet wide.

        The main entrance to the lobby of the hotel is from this private street. This provides a porte cochere, which affords protection to those alighting from carriages in inclement weather.

-- New York Times

Rochester, New York, circa 1908. "Hotel Seneca, Clinton Avenue at Cortland Street." Last glimpsed here, the hotel (interior view here) was razed in 1969. 8x10 inch glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

In Surgery: 1909

In Surgery: 1909

Detroit circa 1909. "Operating room" is all it says here, and we're sure whatever that is on the floor will mop right up. 8x10 glass negative. View full size.

 
 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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