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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNAVAL EN LA HABANA, 1941

Lincoln Park: 1905

Lincoln Park: 1905

Chicago circa 1905. "The bridge, Lincoln Park." We'll meet under the tree at noon for egg salad sandwiches. Detroit Publishing Glass negatives. View full size.

 

This bridge shows up elsewhere in Shorpy

Hello Dave!

I left an earlier comment & photo for this photo, and neglected to include an obvious cross-reference.

This bridge is visible at the center of another Shorpy view of Lincoln Park

Plus 106 years

Chicago, August 28 2011. The South Pond bridge, Lincoln Park. A perfect summer Sunday - 75 degrees F and a slight breeze.

Chicagoans of yore left current residents an amazing legacy in our 500+ parks. Lincoln Park may be the best park of all.

1200 acres along Lake Michigan, with facilities for almost every popular sport, including golf, soccer, field hockey, baseball, tennis and beach volleyball. There's a zoo and several small-boat harbors.

I commute by bicycle in fair weather. If I take the Lincoln Park lakefront path, it adds 4 miles to my trip. And I opt for the lakefront path almost every day.

Looks so peaceful

But remember, all of the people in this photo will see the devastation in San Francisco after the quake. They will suffer through influenza, WWI, the market crash, the depression and WWII. I think I will stay in my own time thank you.

Under-bridge lighting

Notice the arc lamp under the bridge superstructure. Perhaps they had a problem with young men and women "spooning" under the bridge at night!

Re: "Idyllic"

This is a photo of Chicago, not Larkspur!

The Bewitching Pool

Picture in your mind an idyllic place. A place with no hustle, no hurry, no worry. A place where the greatest care a child ever will have is the flavor of cookies or type of pie being baked by this world's sole adult inhabitant, the kindly caretaker known to all as "Aunt T". On the bridge over a brook brother and sister known simply as Jeb and Sport have dropped in from an alien world. A world unlike Aunt T's place near her beautiful, bewitching pool. For this pool truly covers the entrance of the Twilight Zone.

Take us back, Aunt T! I promise I won't ever leave again.

Rod Serling be praised. His storytelling in that episode was so complete and compelling that after nearly 45 years I remembered at once that episode just from seeing the children pictured in an otherwise unrelated image. In truth, I see nothing but Aunt T's refuge and I'm certain she resides just beyond that bridge.

Thanks, Dave. I needed that today.

Simpler times.

This picture is so appealing. Makes me wish I could climb into it and start over.

Look up "idyllic" in the dictionary

and it will have this picture.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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