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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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© 2014 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Brooklyn Bridge: 1904

Brooklyn Bridge: 1904

Circa 1904. "Manhattan, East River and Brooklyn Bridge from Brooklyn." Another grayscale view of an evergreen subject. 8x10 glass negative. View full size.

 

What's the story, Jerry?

Note the large gathering of people under the Brooklyn Tower, and mid-span on bridge. Also, there seems to be a trolley stationed every couple of hundred feet along the Brooklyn bound roadway, perfectly spaced. What do you suppose was happening?

Fulton Ferry Terminal

If you run your eye down the leg of the right-hand, Eastern leg, you can see the distinctive gingerbread terminal of the Fulton Ferry on Brooklyn's Old Fulton Street. It was built long before the bridge, in 1865 when the Civil War ended, and burned down 20 years after this photograph was taken.

Harold Lloyd filmed here in 1927

This view looks up Everit Street to where it meets Old Fulton Street. Elevated trolley tracks ran from left to right along Old Fulton. Harold Lloyd filmed here in 1927 for his final silent feature comedy Speedy. During the movie Harold races a horse-drawn trolley north up Everit, crossing Old Fulton. The elevated tracks visible during the shot block the Brooklyn Bridge from view.

This photo shows (i) a detailed view of Everit at Fulton (oval), looking north, where Lloyd filmed, (ii) a corresponding movie frame from Speedy looking north up Everit at Old Fulton, and (iii) a modern view of the spot.

You can access a photo annotated tour of where Lloyd filmed scenes for Speedy in Brooklyn on my Silent Locations blog, at this URL, and in my book Silent Traces.

http://silentlocations.wordpress.com/2011/05/16/harold-lloyd-brooklyn-sp...

Brooklyn bridge

confirmed by the photo, has three different curvatures to the road deck, I imagine there is a proper engineering term to describe it. And those two trees growing in Brooklyn.

Harold Lloyd filmed here in 1927

Harold Lloyd filmed scenes from his final silent feature Speedy (released in 1928) racing north up Everit Street, pictured here, crossing Old Fulton Street which runs from left to right. At the time elevated tracks ran above Old Fulton Street. Lloyd filmed one stunt here with two cameras filming from opposing points of view, and inserted the shots into the movie at different times - thus creating two stunts for the price of one.

This pdf from my Silent Locations blog takes you to an annotated written tour showing you where Lloyd filmed in Brooklyn, including the setting shown here. My book Silent Visions shows where Lloyd filmed all over New York and Coney Island.

http://silentlocations.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/lloyd-brooklyn-speedy...

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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