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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • AUSTRALIA TRAVEL, c. 1930

Outside the Box: 1912

Outside the Box: 1912

Cleveland circa 1912. "Rockefeller Building, Superior Avenue." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Ta-Ta to the Trolley

My guess is that no East-bound cars stop there any more. I rode Cleveland street cars to kindergarten and downtown in the late '40s, and in hindsight I suspect some of the cars that carried me had been in service since before this photo was taken.

100 years young!

This handsome structure looks just as good today, built to last:


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Weddell House

WEDDELL HOUSE, Superior Ave. and Bank (W. 6th) St., was the best known of the early hotels built in Cleveland in the first half of the 19th century. Early settler and businessman PETER M. WEDDELL† employed Geo. P. Smith to build the hotel on Superior St., replacing his successful mercantile store. Weddell House opened in 1847, and was a 5-story brick-and-sandstone structure with about 200 rooms, including offices, stores, several parlors, and a large dining room on the first 2 floors. The demand for rooms was so great that the hotel was enlarged in 1853, when a 4-story addition was built on W. 6th St. The most historic occasion associated with the hotel was the appearance and address of president-elect Lincoln on 15 Feb. 1861, during his inaugural trip to Washington. In 1904 the original portion of the hotel was razed and replaced by the ROCKEFELLER BUILDING The W. 6th St. addition remained until 1961.

Weddell House

Fire drill!

Who wants to climb the fire escape ladder on the building in the left foreground?

If it looks like Louis Sullivan, but it's not

... it's Sullivanesque! This is one of the most faithful imitations of a Louis Sullivan Chicago School skyscraper to be found anywhere. The Rockefeller Building, completed 1905, was designed by the Cleveland firm of Knox and Elliot. The four bays at the far left are an addition of 1910, designed to match the original block exactly. It would be too beautiful if the architects had once worked for the architectural firm of Adler and Sullivan, but in fact they both worked for another Chicago firm, Burnham and Root. And yes, the client for this building was John D. Rockefeller Sr.

Great.

I imagine this grand and great building was designed by Louis Sullivan or someone of his ilk.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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