The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE CITY OF RUINS AND ROSES, c. 1930

Meet the Mauros: 1911

Meet the Mauros: 1911

New York. December 1911. "5 p.m. Mrs. Mary Mauro, 309 E. 110th St., 2nd floor. Family works on feathers (sewing them together for use as a hat trimming). Make $2.25 a week. In vacation two or three times as much. Victoria, 8 yrs. Angelina 10 yrs. (a neighbor). Frorandi 10 yrs. Maggie 11 yrs. All work except two boys against wall. Father is street cleaner and has steady job. Girls work until 7 or 8 p.m. Once Maggie worked until 10 p.m." Glass plate by Lewis Wickes Hine. View full size.

 

Meet the Mauros: 1911

This is Joe Manning, of the Lewis Hine Project. My story of this family is posted. I interviewed the daughter of the boy who is sleeping in the photo. Her interview still gives me goosebumps. This is one of my favorites among the many stories I have done.
www.sevensteeples.com/mauro1.html

Migratory Bird Treaty Act

A major reason for passage of the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act was to protect birds from being harvested for their feathers. Before the MBTA, it was estimated that a few million birds per year were killed to provide decorative plumes for hats.

Childcare circa 1922

It's crafts day at the childcare center, except it has work and care.

Rock-A-Bye-Baby

Looks like Mom figured a way to work and rock the baby at the same time with the rocker base on the crib, I like that! They seem pretty happy and look well fed even though they work long hours. Every hand helping for the good of the family. During this time learning sewing skills may have helped some of the little girls make their living or open a business later in life. Too bad most girls today have no such skills or interests.

I want to know

I want to know more about the little one behind Mama, that can't help out.

No way Tito!

If googlemaps is to be believed, it would appear that section of East 110th St has been renamed Tito Puente Way. "309" is on the door.


View Larger Map

Tic Tac Toe

On the wall is probably one of their sources of fun!

Meet the Mauros: 1911

This is Joe Manning, of the Lewis Hine Project. I recently interviewed the daughter of the toddler who is sleeping in the arms of his brother. I will notify Shorpy when my story of this family is completed.

[Sounds fascinating! - Dave]

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.