The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2014 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNAVAL EN LA HABANA, 1941

Omnibus Stop: 1913

Omnibus Stop: 1913

July 10, 1913, New York. "Fifth Avenue Omnibus." View full size. 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. Click here for a closeup of the bus on the right. Radiator nameplate reads "De Dion Bouton."

 

De Dion Bouton

Both Fifth Avenue Coach Company buses were built by De Dion Bouton, a French manufacturer. The double decker, No.67, was one of 67 with 34-seat bodies by J G Brill of Philadelphia supplied between 1907 and 1910. The 23-seat single-decker, No. 201, of 1912, had a Paris-style open rear platform and was converted to a double-decker in 1914.

Starter mechanism

Note the crank handle below the radiator. Did these beasts really start in 10 degree weather? The non-pneumatic tires against the cobblestone were handy at keeping one awake if the air horn didn't do it. All the modern conveniences too - lights, fire extinguisher, well appointed interior and ambient air conditioning.

De Dion-Bouton

Stanford White's Arch

It sure was designed by him:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_White

The arch would have been about 21 years old at the time of this photograph.

The Arch

I seem to forget, was the archway situated on the right hand side in Washington Square Park, designed by Stanford White?

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.