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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE NEW ZEALAND FOREST, c. 1950

And His Little Dog, Too: 1938

And His Little Dog, Too: 1938

July 1938. "Man who lives in row house. Baltimore, Maryland." Walkies, anyone? Photo by John Vachon for the Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

re: re: Pre-Fab steps

With the varying bits of trim, they definitely look like wooden construction. The notches would provide drainage.

re: Pre-Fab steps

I thought the same thing regarding the steps until I realized that they follow the incline of the sidewalk, hard to do with pre-fab. I think they are wooden.

Pre-fab steps

For all you construction aficionados, these steps appear to be pre-fab concrete. The notches on the base are slotted so they can be moved into place via a fork lift. Didn't realize they were available back in '38.

What's going on to the left of the door?

Two and 1/4 full bricks to the left of the door there's a vertical line showing a change of tone that looks like poor photoshopping. Is that actually the color of the wall or was the photo manipulated somehow?

[As a previous commenter has already pointed out, those aren't real bricks. - tterrace]

Pre-Formstone Painted Brick

In the 1950s and 1960s, many old Baltimore row houses that were built with soft, porous brick were covered with formstone, a fake stone/stucco product. Before formstone, the soft brick often was painted to protect it from moisture seepage. What appear to be bricks set in mortar in the picture actually is a brick wall painted in a dark color (usually dark maroon) that then was painted with a white stencil to give the appearance of bricks. The telltale signs are the thin, perfect white "mortar" lines and the slight change in coloration at the point where the house in the picture joins the house next door. Although there were lots of similarly painted houses when I was growing up in the 1960s, I have not seen one in many years.

Awww...

We acquired a ratter this summer as a rescue dog (30 lbs. overweight!) He's down to fighting trim again (22lbs.) - a little stockier than this chap, we were told he's a type of rat terrier know as a Teddy Roosevelt, somewhat akin to a Jack Russell with an off switch.

If the dog could do it... I'm just sayin'.

National Bo, Anyone?

No one seeing this gentleman's abdominal development could doubt Baltimore's former pre-eminence in the brewing industry.

Lucky Dog!

Obviously a much loved pooch. Bet they had a wonderful life together. A pet can make life so much better.

Rockin' that Harness.

I love rat terriers, they are surprisingly lazy dogs for their trim size and would suit this guy perfectly as they love nothing more than to sit next to you and sleep. I so want that harness for my dog.

Walkies?

More like rollies!

They say people look like their pets.

Not so much here.

 
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