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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • UNFAIR TO BABIES, 1936

The Most Perfect Moving Pictures: 1907

The Most Perfect Moving Pictures: 1907

Circa 1907. "Laconia, New Hampshire -- Main Street." A highlight here is the handbill advertising "the most perfect moving pictures" and "animated pantomimic dramas" at the Folsom Opera House. View full size.

 

Ouch

What's this? A 1907 downtown without a single painless dentist in sight!

Time changes things

The building at left would be occupied by F. W. Woolworth within a couple of years. The barbershop and unusual barber pole remained, but moved next door. Woolworth later relocated up the street to a new building on Bank Square at Main and Pleasant Streets, where the Eagle Hotel sits in the 1907 photo. None of the 1907 buildings appear to exist now.

The other side of the family?

On the left, we have Quimby Drugs; on the right, Quinby & Son Sporting Goods & Fishing Tackle.

Tuesday, July 23, 1907

Shorpy-inspired in-depth research shows that the circus poster proclaiming fun on Tuesday, July 23 - and a comparison with old calendars - proves that date fell in 1907.

Laundry and Meat

Nice to know what’s in those wagons.

Wow! We Finally See One Labeled!

In the right foreground - a real meat wagon! This one seems to have some real body parts aboard too.

No motorcars

I count at least eleven horse carts, but nothing motorized. In most city scenes of this era with this many vehicles visible, you can usually spy at least one or two horseless carriages. Is their lack here just happenstance, or is there a deeper underlying reason for it, such as lack of reliable gasoline supplies to the distant reaches of New Hampshire?

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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