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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • NORTH TUSCANY COAST, 1948

We Come in Peace: 1936

We Come in Peace: 1936

"NO CAPTION, 1936" is the label for this Harris & Ewing plate. We think it probably has to do with diving, or maybe Roswell. View full size.

 

"Break out the Momsen lungs!"

Momsen lungs make an appearance in the 1958 movie Torpedo Run starring Glen Ford and Ernest Borgnine.

When the Grayfish submarine is damaged by depth charges and sinks to the bottom of Tokyo Bay, Lt. Cmdr. Barney Doyle (Glenn Ford) gives the order to use them in order to save his crew.

Rivets

Paul A is partly right, the pan head - the "factory head" - is formed during the manufacture of the rivet . But when they driven hot, as these were, the shop head on the other end is formed by the snap, which is the tool inserted in either the rivet gun or horseshoe rivetter.

Look at the shop heads on the rivets closest to the floor and you can see some where the rivet was slightly short, and the edge of the snap has gouged the plate as the head was formed. And there are a few where the rivet was slightly long, and there is a "rag", or flash around the head where the excess metal has been squeezed out around the snap.

In the '70s

we used Steinke hoods. Lock your thumbs together with hands extended overhead to break through any debris that may be on the surface. Look up & holler "ho, ho, ho" all the way up; this, to make sure that you exhaled air as it expanded in your lungs due to decreasing water pressure as you ascend.

I'm pretty sure the fellow on the left will not be looking up. If he does, he won't be saying "ho, ho, ho".

Tank and rivets

That tank behind them has a port hole window in it. I'll bet that's the 100 foot training tank. As for the rivets, they're made with the cone shaped head and the other end is peened over with an air hammer after inserted so it ends up domed shape.

Rivet heads

As usual in a Shorpy photo I look at the tiniest of background details. The cone head rivets and flat head ones. Why the mix on the same boiler, tank, or whatever that is?

Interesting...

choice of footwear for swimming!

How could we make this image an Internet meme?

Submarine escape training

Rute Boye and tcrosse nailed it.

It's a Momsen Lung!

OUCH!

The somewhat pained expression on the faces of the two gentlemen on the left and right might have something to do with the location of the straps on the lower part of their bodies.

Momsen Lung

It looks like various iterations of the Momsen Lung under test at the US Navy Submarine School escape training facility at New London, CT.

Training

Sub school submarine escape training.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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