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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SUMMER IN ITALY, 1951

Allwite Morning: 1942

Allwite Morning: 1942

September 1942. "New York. Third Avenue elevated railway station in the Seventies at 8:30 a.m." America's Favorite at the "Guess It" scales. Photo by Marjory Collins for the Office of War Information. View full size.

 

1950s

Before I was born, in the 1950s, my dad owned a restaurant under the 3rd Ave El line, I believe it was the 76th Station on one of the corners. I saw a photo of the store front once among the large photo collection of my parents. I need to go through the photos one day soon to see whether the photograph is noteworthy enough to share.

Shorpy brings me home!

That is definitely the corner of Third Avenue and East 89th Street -- I lived about 50 yards west of that spot for several years.

I always marveled to imagine the long-gone elevated station and how different my corner used to look.

Wankel's Hardware is a neighborhood mainstay that maintains a wonderful commitment to hiring developmentally challenged people. In a city where many "hardware" stores really aren't, I always valued having it nearby. I'm glad to see the store getting a little moment in the long-ago sun on Shorpy.

I should have been born earlier

I admire how stylish women in the 40's were!

I see others found the location

but I think it deserves a current pic. That hardware store is beautifully painted.


View Larger Map

A Finer, Richer White

Cleans and Makes All White Shoes WHITER!

Blackout

Since the United States had entered World War II by this date, I assume the lightbulbs in the overhead fixtures were special blackout bulbs that only allowed a small amount of light to be directed downward. There is a story here about these lightbulbs.

89th Street station

It's the 89th Street station, looking south from the downtown platform. If it weren't for the people on the platform blocking the view we'd be able to see the platforms of the 84th Street station a bit further down the line. There aren't a lot of photos of 89th Street online, here are a few:
http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/showpix?nsta=311146
No, the steam locomotive in the last photo is not a mistake; the Third Avenue El used steam traction for the first few decades after it opened in 1878.

89th Street closed along with the rest of the Third Avenue El in Manhattan in 1955. It wasn't needed anymore, as people soon would be able to ride a modern subway a block away on Second Avenue, and ... oh wait.

Next stop

The sign on the opposite platform suggests that this isn't in the 70s, but is instead the 89th St. station.

[More like 83rd. -tterrace]

It's a bit blurry & might look like "83rd," but I don't think that's right, for 2 reasons. First, 1573 Third Ave (Wankel's Hardware) is between 88th & 89th. Second, there wasn't an 83rd St stop, but there was one at 89th.

Wankel's hardware

"The same family since 1896" http://www.wankelshardware.com/

Same as it ever was

There is still a hardware store at 1573 Third Avenue.

Wankel Hardware - since 1896.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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