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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE TOY DEPARTMENT, 1913

Seed and Feed: 1942

Seed and Feed: 1942

"Seed and Feed store in Lincoln, Nebraska." Another view of the Grand Grocery farm store in 1942. "The apples, oranges and grapefruit are surplus commodities" sold at very low prices. View full size. 35mm Kodachrome transparency by John Vachon, Farm Security Administration.

 

Sudan Grass

We had a field of sudan grass -- probably about 5 acres, maybe a little more--on our farm in Oklahoma, right around 1960. We used it for a handful of cows and many, many hogs. It was truly a great place to play. The pigs beat paths through the tall, tall grass, which turned the field into a giant maze. And the sudan grass grew so thick, it even absorbed sound. Thanks for the memories.

Feed and Seed: 1942

In 1942 we would have had five acres of sudan on our farm. It was used for livestock feed. It would grow to 6+ feet tall and my teenage buddies and I had a great place to play hide and seek. If dad let the milk cows in to graze the stalks they could be a real challenge for a little kid to find and drive to the barn.

Sudan Grass

I had to look up "Sudan Grass." Apparently it's a type of sorghum used for fodder. It would fit with the feed store side of the business.

Oranges

This week I bought oranges. I got 3 Florida navels for $2.00.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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