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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CHRISTMAS PRINTS

Petroleum Palace: 1928

Petroleum Palace: 1928

San Francisco, 1928. "Buick sedan at Texaco service station. Jack Tar Hotel site." Now all long gone. 5x7 glass negative by Christopher Helin. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

These were called

"kick plates." They protect the splash apron from scuffing, and you can tap the side of your shoe against the vertical part to dislodge dirt or slush. This design has a little doormat built in.

Best quip about the JTH

"The box Disneyland came in."

Per Old Photo Fan query

My best guess is that it's to keep your foot from hitting the body's paint job and/or keeping your dirty shoes from leaving anything somewhere more important.

A palace for cars

For some reason, in the 1920's, gas stations and movie theatres were both lavishly constructed; so much so that it almost became legendary.

Re: Jack Tar Hotel

There are times when only a heartfelt "My God!" will do.

Why it was beloved

The Jack Tar Hotel.

Jack Tar Hotel

Story on its demolition.

About the car

Can anybody tell me the function of that section of the running board below the driver's door?

One year in

The drum headlights mark this handsome Buick as a 1927 model. Looking good for a one year old.

Where is the chauffeur?

Owner's initials on the passanger door. And where is the Man With The Star? Should be three, gas, tires/windshield, fluids. Visible pumps can't be seen by the invisible driver.

Interesting Early Automobile Age Architecture !

What would you call that? Moorish Art Deco? Spanish Mediterranean Art Deco? Man. they sure don't build them like that anymore!

The only feature that does not seem desirable is that the roofed fueling area is attached to the main structure without a solid firewall. There's a viewing window, and perhaps a door, from the main structure into the fueling bay wing. This would be problematic in case of a fire.

Other than that, today's gas station architects should sit up and take notice that a large gas station does not have to be an eyesore!

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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