SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 

 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2017 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Ninety-Nine Bottles: 1948

Ninety-Nine Bottles: 1948

New York circa 1948. "Ruppert Beer display in grocery window." It's light. It's delicious. It's S-L-O-W aged. 4x5 negative by John M. Fox. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Ruppert Knickerbocker

My dad drank Ruppert Knickerbocker back in the 60s. It was the first beer I ever tasted (with his permission). I also remember Ballantyne and Rheingold as well. I don't think I ever saw him with anything but a local/regional beer until well into the 70s. By then the local breweries couldn't compete with the nationals and mostly disappeared even if the names lived on for a while.

Now, thanks to the craft beer movement, there's a bunch of local NYC breweries again.

The Beer that made the Yankees

Colonel Jacob Ruppert, owner of the Jacob Ruppert Brewing Company, and owner of the New York Yankees from 1915 until his death in 1939. He (and his money) remade the perennially losing Yankees to a legendary baseball dynasty, winning the World Championship seven times before his death, brought Babe Ruth to New York and built the original Yankee Stadium. Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013. That's how far "beer money" can go.

Tastes like loneliness

Mmmm...Beer, Cheez-its and a can of Chef Boy-ar-Dee (center bottom of frame). Lonely bachelor food.

Serving Suggestion

Ruppert Beer and Chef Boy-ar-dee spaghetti and meatballs. Mmmmm good!

Not featured: Trommers White Label

That's an awful lot of Ruppert inventory to tie up in a window... only a wall sign in the distance for Trommers White Label.

I had no idea that Bushwick-based Trommers was a player in the competitive Northern NJ brewery scene. Seems they bought The Orange Brewery, which operated in Orange, NJ from 1901 to 1935, and operated as The John F. Trommers Brewery. Liebmann Brewers took over in 1950 and bottled Rheingold Beer at the site until 1977. And I always thought of Rheingold as a hometown brand... go figure.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2017 Shorpy Inc.