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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • TO EUROPE THE AMERICAN WAY

Newsstand Noir: 1957

Newsstand Noir: 1957

My brother snapped this 35mm Kodak Tri-X negative as a former high school classmate left (Fled? Took it on the lam?) from this newsstand at 1241 Fourth Street in San Rafael, California. At the time this was one of two newsstands downtown. That was in addition to Montgomery Ward, J.C. Penney, Macy's plus all the other kinds of stores that made San Rafael the major shopping spot for Marin Country - that is, until shopping centers started popping up a few years later.

If I didn't know better, I'd think that guy might have been Elvis. View full size.

On Shorpy:
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Speaking of parking meters

I remember one evening a bunch of us were hanging out at the Foster's Freeze when a car, obviously out of control, jumped the curb and knocked down a parking meter (at the same exact place incidentally that the cop car was de-axled in "American Grafitti"). The car backed up and sped away at which time we dashed for the meter and took it up the hill to disgorge its contents. After an hour of bashing it refused to give up its booty and for all I know the meter is still up on the hill in back of Foster's Freeze. Our adventure didn't make it into the movie.

Elvis confusion

I have to agree with your comment about Elvis; at first glance I thought it was him too. I don't doubt it will eventually find its way into the fan circles misconstrued as a long-lost unreleased candid. Cool pic nonetheless.

Body language

That looks like the pose taken by my high school pals when leaving a store that had sold beer to the underaged. You know, hiding it under the coattail as if nobody would notice it or him. Saw it a hundred times, hehe.

Parking meters

Don't know about whitewall tires, barber poles or typewriters, let alone Elvis, but downtown San Rafael is still loaded with parking meters. No Cool Hand Lukes roaming around lopping them off with a pipe cutter though.

2 things you don't see anymore

Typewriters
Parking meters
White wall tires
Barber poles

[And then some. -tterrace]

Fourth Street holds many memories

The Rafael Theater where some serious necking was done. Next door, the Navy recruiter where I solemnly vowed to protect my country in 1962. J.C. Penney's where I bought most of my clothes. The two auto parts stores across the street from each other where I furnished my 1957 Ford F-100. And not to forget the Friday and Saturday night cruises where the county gathered from Highway 101 to Foster's Freeze and back again countless times. It was a great place to spend my senior year.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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