SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 

 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2017 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Dead End: 1958

Dead End: 1958

Was Mrs. Smith bringing in the wash when she heard the crash? Circa 1958, more vehicular mayhem in Oakland, California. 4x5 negative. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Pleased

To see that the house has survived with all those nice details intact. Maybe the name of the street isn't as ironic as it seemed back in 1958 when this picture was taken.

Those darned kids

From the age of the car and the fact that it was clearly a rollover and not a collision, I'd say it was teenage hot rodders who lost control...probably hopped up on that awful rock and roll music.

Stumped By Stick

Most of the time, in these accident photos, you can see how things happened. The trunk fell off in the rollover (or was removed by the wrecker crew when they righted the car that might have ended up on its roof at the end of the crash).
But how did the stick get in the window? Is it lower molding or beltline trim that fell off, and the wreckers set it there by hand, to be towed away with the rest of the car?
Why wouldn't they have put the laundry and trunk lid inside too, if that was so?
It could not have started inside the car. It would not have fit.
And it could not have been picked up as a part of the accident. It would never have stayed in that position.
Very odd stick.

6208 (Mis) Fortune Way

Location is 6208 Fortune Way, Oakland. Still there, right down to the house number display on the pillar.

6208 Fortune Way

The address is 6208 Fortune way. It doesn't look like fortune favored the shutters on this house...let alone the accident.

Good heavens

Is that a street sign driven into the back of the driver's seat? Poor soul.

Looks like a bad one

I'd like to know the story behind some of these wrecks. This one really looks like someone probably got taken to the morgue rather than the hospital. I wonder if the laundry was in the trunk of the car? Looks like blood on the side of the car and on the blanket over the tricycle. May have hit a pedestrian that was carrying the laundry. Also what the heck is sticking out of the window of the car?
Dave thanks for sharing these even though a lot of people seem to protest. I know they can be rather grim but history isn't always all wine and roses. If they are unfavorable to some they can always just skip by them.

Impaled

What the heck is that sticking out of the driver's window? This crash does not look like it had a good result, unless all the clothes in the car cushioned the driver.

Cause of accident

Swerving to avoid a kid on a tricycle?

Upside Down

It sure looks like a lot of these Oakland accidents involve rollovers. Hum. High center of gravity?

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2017 Shorpy Inc.