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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

Juniata Is Swamped: 1925

Juniata Is Swamped: 1925

G.W. Is Victor by 32 to 0 Score

Hayman, at Tackle, Is Star as Juniata Is Swamped

        George Washington University backfield players, escorted by an interference which laid low first and secondary defense, six times traversed the goal line of the Juniata college eleven of Huntington, Pa., yesterday at Central stadium and produced a 32-0 victory over the team which last year triumphed 7 to 0 at Huntington in the game between the two teams.

-- Shirley Povich, Washington Post, 10/4/1925

Oct. 3, 1925. Washington, D.C. "Geo. Wash. U. vs. Juniata Col. at Central High." National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

Six "traverses" equals 32 points if...

...two of those are safeties, in which the defense "traverses" the offensive team's goal line and tackles the ball carrier behind it. Two points per safety gives you four points. Add on four touchdowns with successful extra-point kicks (seven points each), and you've got 32.

That's the only way that works out, as far as I can figure.

Missed block

Looks like GW's #14 missed his block on Juniata's #37 (or 87). Between the unblocked defender and the sideline, I doubt this play gained much, if any - unless the halfback quickly bounced it outside to his left, but that probably didn't happen. The look on the runner's face tells me he's determined to smash straight ahead.

Maurys Dad

Byline: Shirley Povich. Maurys Dad (in 14 years).

Shirley Povich continued writing for the Post until 1998!

Shirley Povich wrote for the Washington Post until his death at 92 in 1998. He started with the Post inn 1923.

Small crowd

Look at all the empty bleachers! Having graduated from GW, I can't imagine such a small turnout if they still had a football team.

What points is a "traverse" worth?

6 traverses of goal line and score of 32 - 0. Today 6 traverses would equal 36 points total score at 6 points per traverse. And the description is almost poetic, though foreign to a current day football fan.

Often Misspelled

Two words associated with Juniata College often come out wrong in print. First, the school comes out as "Juanita," and, at least this news story got that right. But, Juniata is in Huntingdon, Pa. and,as happens, this story misspells the name of the town.

Run On

The Great Period Shortage of 1925 greatly reduced the readability of the news.

No hashmarks?

I'm guessing this must have been before they used hashmarks on the field, since it looks like the play started right next to the sideline. Sure glad they changed that rule.

 
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