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Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JOIN THE NAVY, 1917

This Old New House: 1900

This Old New House: 1900

From around 1900 we bring you someone's new house in the vicinity of Stafford, Connecticut. Fancy millwork abounds! 5x8 glass negative. View full size.

 
On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5

The Handsome Gas Lamp

Note that the lamppost has two crossbars near the bottom and one just below the lamp. This is almost certainly a gas lamp. The crossbars at the bottom are steps for the lamplighter, and the one at the top is a hand-hold or ladder rest.

Also note the lack of any signs of electrical service to the house.

[Also note the lamppost stops before it gets to the lamp. This is a kerosene fixture with a burner on top. - Dave]

Illuminating

I'm intrigued by the lamppost, which looks very modern!

Re: Gingerbread kit

The kit home in Lake View, New York (about twenty-thirty miles south of Buffalo, NY) cited in the advertisement is still standing and happily occupied to this day. Those homes, while being kit homes, were built to last!

First, Second, and Third Reaction, and Counting

In my last neighborhood of some 25 years, I had a neighbor who had one of those 3-story Victorian things all covered in gingerbread. When I first moved there, the house was merely 2-color. About ten years later, the neighborhood was zoned "historic" and the local "hysterical commission" ruled that all renovations should be rigidly return to originality. Painting thereafter included a process of paintchip lab analysis to determine original colors. So I watched my neighbor tediously paint that gingerbread behemoth in seven colors, much of it on countless lathe-turned bits. Sure, it was pretty when it was all done, but....It made me absolutely love my slightly moldy brick.

My first thought (and my mother's as well) on the current acreage with grass like that was "goats", but I've learned to simply appreciate the sight of grass just like that in the home shown here--it's positively lovely to watch ripple like waves on a pond on a breezy day, while providing a habitat for countless butterflies by day and fireflies in the millions by night. One of my neighbors does goats, while another does llamas.

It Never Rains in Connecticut!

So no need for gutters or downspouts.

Lawn Care

Or they could be out getting a couple of goats.

Gingerbread Kit?

Looks like the sort of house you could order from the Sears catalog:

Beautiful house, but

My first reaction was, "Wow, would I hate to have to paint that baby!"

That is a beautiful home

... but it looks to me like the owner should invest in a lawn mower.

[He's on his way to pick up a scythe at Home Depot. - Dave]

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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