SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
 
The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

  
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content

Join our mailing list (enter email):


 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2018 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CLASSIC CHRISTMAS ART

Christmas Clean-Up: 1956

Christmas Clean-Up: 1956

I found this slide dated December 1956 at a local swap meet. View full size.

On Shorpy:
Today's Top 5
..

Mom and daughter

--judging by the identical friendly smiles. I think I'd rather eat here than with the tidy, but unsmiling, family in the photo shown above this one.

Outlet

One is for the icebox. What's the other? Is that an electric clock behind Mom's head?

Honorable mention to Mom's cat glasses. Worthy of a neck chain.

Where oh where is the kitchen staple

Swing A Way can opener hiding??

Painted Metal Cabinet

It appears that the base cabinet was one of the many enameled factory-made steel kitchen cabinets which were popular in the mid 20th-century. I suspect the paint that has worn off was a homeowner-applied finish over the factory enamel.

Clean as you go

Obviously they are finally finishing up since the silverware and utensils are always in the bottom of the sink. They had mashed potatoes, too, because the potato masher is there. Some one on the left is the drier but didn’t make it in the photo. I’m a clean as you cook person. My mother in law was a cook, pile the pans up and clean everything after dessert which I found exhausting after a heavy meal.

Trend Dishwashing Detergent

Still around today, Trend Dishwashing Detergent, was just packaged a bit differently.

Touched by an Apron

Interesting to see how all those hours of toil have worn the enamel off the cabinet under the sink.

Polarized outlets

They were pretty standard by the mid-20s, but polarized plugs failed to catch on until they were made mandatory for some appliances beginning in 1978. Many of the old non-grounding outlets have the T-shaped slots, in order to accept the old 1904 Hubbell tandem-blade plugs, which were fairly common before the parallel plug was standardized in 1921. The modern grounding outlet was developed circa 1949, but did not become common until after 1962. The GFCI was invented by Charles Dalziel in 1961, although a similar device had been developed earlier in South Africa, for use in the diamond mines.

Extra Handle

I'm going to guess that it's to stop the flow through the spout and divert it to the sprayer at the left.

Plumbing

I see handles for hot and cold water. There's another handle on the spout. Does anyone know what that's for?

Non-grounded

And who ever heard of a GFCI? At least, one that would fit in a 2x4 box.

I still have 3 or 4 ungrounded outlets in our much-modified home, originally built in 1954. Knob & tube in those walls!

Water and Electricity

That was the era of two-pronged electrical outlets.

[Non-polarized, too. - Dave]

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2018 Shorpy Inc.
sphere