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[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNAVAL EN LA HABANA, 1941

Road Locomotive: 1920

Road Locomotive: 1920

The actress Grace Valentine circa 1920 in an expensive looking Packard roadster. 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. View full size.

 

Good Luck

"... and rode on 37-inch wheels."

Good luck trying to change one of those with a fence post and some rocks.

Packard Twin Six

"A landmark that established the V-12 engine as the ultimate luxury-car powerplant." The Twin Six was powered by a 424 cubic-inch engine, the first automotive V12, and rode on 37-inch wheels. Nice writeup here:

http://www.drivingtoday.com/greatest_cars/packard_twinsix/

Those wheels are huge!

Puts today's 20-inch rims to shame.

That Packard

Solid metal wheels at a time when most cars still had wood spokes.

Cowl Vent

The flap in front of the windscreen is a cowl vent to direct fresh air to your feet. The one on the side just in front of the door is most likely a vent also, and the square panel in front of the rear fender is an access for greasing the rear springs.

Custom Packard

"My other car made me look fat."

The Car

What's the purpose of the flap on the hood in front of the windshield? Also, can you open the door only by a latch on the inside? I guess it takes a certain amount of finesse to stand on the little step, open the door and swing yourself in.

Yards Per Gallon

Holy cow! I think some of Russell Lee's Resettlement Administration families lived in shacks that had less square footage than that car. What would the gas mileage have been on such an automobile?

Oh yeah ..

Looks like it was built like a tank! It ain't a Prius, that's for sure.

Custom Body

Wow! What a car. This is indeed a Packard, with a custom body probably supplied by one of the several coachbuilding firms then in business. In fact, with all the distinctive features it has I wouldn't be surprised if someone wrote in and identified the builder.

Size Matters

The equivalent of today's $60,000 Hummer in size and price. I can't get over how big this "car" is, if it can even be called that. I love Packards.

[I would guess that this car cost the better part of $10,000. - Dave]

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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