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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • FRENCH BICYCLE GODDESS, c. 1898

Honeymoon Hotel: 1941

Honeymoon Hotel: 1941

August 1941. "Boardinghouse in Baraga, Michigan," a.k.a. the Honeymoon Hotel. View full size. Medium format safety negative by John Vachon for the FSA. This was scanned from an uncaptioned and somewhat misfiled print of the negative. Thanks to Anonymous Tipster for pointing us in the right direction (north).

 

Forty years earlier...

The hotel 40 years earlier.

Cool!

My jaw dropped when I saw the pic and caption! I grew up in this area, and it's always fun to stumble upon these things on the web!! Thanks for posting, and thanks to the previous poster for the website with all the other pictures! I am a sucker for history and historical buildings and how things were back then.... This is a very haunting building... I love the ambience of it.

Very cool!

Looks Like a Hopper Painting

That sky is spooky. Not a soul in sight. Amazing photo.

While in the neighborhood....

The buildings noted in Highway41north.com, #2, #3/#4 are long gone but St. Anne's Catholic Church in #5 looks pretty much the same however it has an addition towards the rear and some needed landscaping around the steps....

Some honeymoon!

Lovely accommodations for Mr. and Mrs. Bates.

Not another view - same photo

Very interesting - the picture #3 that you reference isn't just another view of the same building - as far as I can tell it's the exact same photo. Makes one wonder about the path they've both taken to make it onto the web. Presumably the picture#3 image is scanned from a print...

[Pics #2 thru #5 on Highway41north.com are all from the LOC archive and were taken by John Vachon. #3 is a low-res scan of a negative; our photo was scanned from a print. - Dave]

No, no Toto, we are in Michigan!

Yay, finally a photo from my home area. This is the old Honeymoon Hotel in Baraga, Michigan, on the Keweenaw Bay Indian Reservation in the Upper Peninsula. This view looks east toward downtown Baraga and across the bay of Keweenaw with the town of L'Anse on the far side. For another view of this once stately building, see:

http://www.highway41north.com/baraga.html

Scroll down to 1940's, pictures #3 and #4. Thanks to Shorpy for this photo even though not as intended but perhaps it will open to its viewers an area that is rich in Indian, fur trade, lumbering, mining history and say, saloons, houses of ill-repute, safehavens for 1930's Chicago gangsters, and yes, I work in a building just a stone's throw from where this photo was taken....

[Oklahoma, Kansas ... Michigan. And it's by John Vachon, not Arthur Rothstein. From 1941, not 1936. So I was pretty close! Caption updated. Thanks. - Dave]

Wait, Toto, we are in Kansas

I would guess this was in Kansas. Not many, if any, of these Second Empire style houses in Oklahoma. Kansas had the earlier settlements that would have built in this style, when Oklahoma was Indian Territory.

[This call number for this photo puts it in a batch of pictures taken in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, in April 1936. - Dave]

 
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