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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • CARNIVAL OF THE ARTS, 1937

Apple of His Eye: 1964

Apple of His Eye: 1964

A friend is having me scan some of her family photos, and I fell in love with this Kodachrome slide; she gave me permission to post it to Shorpy. It's her sister and their great-grandfather on his farm in Sabattus, Maine, in 1964. View full size.

Re: Baby Rings

I worked w/ my father in his jewelry store back in the '60s and remember the little display of Baby Rings he sold there. They came in an assortment of about 12 rings, various designs and sizes (ALL very small!) If I remember correctly, they even had an "As Advertised in LIFE MAGAZINE" sticker on the box.

(I've been following SHORPY a few years, but it's taken me this long to get to this photo)

Beautiful

This is such a fabulous picture in so many ways, thank you so much for sharing.

A buck a bushel basket

That's what it cost at the farmers' market back in the early 1950's.
The only thing was that they were ungraded as to size.
There were some gigantic ones, some tiny ones and all the sizes in between.

The qualities I recall most were that they were ripe, hard, juicy and crisp.
Most of the apples available now at the supermarket are soft mush. Bleh!!

A determined toddler

Reminds me of the time my 14 month old drilled into an orange with as much efficiency as hungry squirrel. If this baby was at least that age then I'm sure she could have made a dent in that apple. This photo is without question one of the most beautiful I can remember. Simply stunning. Thanks so much!

Wow

I love everything about this picture.

My Momma

Wow. This is my momma. What an amazing pic. LOVE YOU

Ericka Lea

Scanswer

Chris M, see my comment here.

Scanner

tterrace, what kind of scanner are you using?

Apple/Pumpkin Film Format

The original is on 126 film, a size developed by Kodak for their series of Instamatic cameras introduced in 1963. Image size is officially 28 x 28 mm, but this was a mounted slide, plus the slight straightening I applied required a teeny bit more cropping around the edges. For all intents and purposes, this is the whole thing.

Ah! Kodachrome

A superb photograph in many respects. If ever the Smithsonian is going to hold an exhibition on what the USA is all about, this picture should be included. It is also a testimony to the wonderful color rendition of classic Kodachrome, something that I think can't be matched by modern emulsions, let alone digital. Dave, can you please post the uncropped image?

[It is uncropped. - Dave]

Apples for the toothless!

The baby probably does not have teeth yet, but her face amazingly expresses her attempt to bite into that edible delight. If you look at the close-up photo, it is quite noticeable how beautiful and flawless all of those crisp, juicy apples are, I don't see a blemish on any of them. I can almost smell the familiar scent of a New England autumn, dried leaves, pumpkin shells, a fragrant apple harvest, the nut-like aroma of summer's end. Many thanks for this telling photo of a truly loving grandpa, an obliviously happy baby (who cannot bite into the apple - I know the feeling) and unmistakable, unposed authenticity. This is a beauty.

Baby Rings

My grandmother kept my father's and my uncle's rings in her jewelry box and would marvel at how small they had once been. I don't know if that was common. If you look at any old catalogue (Sears etc.), you will see that baby rings were once very common.

Pumpketeer

Thank you for sharing this beautiful photograph. I love old photographs. I have set this one as my desktop wallpaper.

[I bet little Lorri never dreamed she'd grow up to be "desktop wallpaper"! - Dave]

That's me!

That is me and my Bubba at his farm in Maine -- I remember that house and how I would ride his tractor up the hill to pick the peas and strawberries. Those were the crops I liked the best. My Nana would make homemade doughnuts and we would all help out in the vegetable stand on the weekends -- not sure how much help I and my sisters and cousins were! The ring was my mom's as a baby and she would put it on me occasionally -- back then she says they did not worry about choking hazards.

GREAT MEMORIES!!!!!

With this ring ...

I can't help but notice the ring on her right hand. As a parent of a toddler, my first thought is: choking hazard!! Is there a story behind this particular ring? I've never noticed a ring on the hand of a child her age now -- were they more common back then?

A Classic

A most beautiful photo. The rich colors of apples and pumpkins and the interaction between the generations of a family. Simply a classic.

That's my great-grandpa

We called him Bubba for some reason. He had a big farm in Maine and a roadside stand that sold just about every fruit and veggie you can think of. My cousins and I used to go pick strawberries and peas in the summer. He was always so patient and sweet, I don't remember a cross word from him ever. If you look close you can see how stained his hands are from farming his whole life (and smoking a pipe).

It's funny what you remember about people but whenever I eat fresh peas or really good strawberries I think of him.

Generations

Note the baby ring. This is something you never see anymore.

Cellar Door

Looks like the cellar door is open in the background. Bet these gems are headed down there. When I lived in Illinois we had a 1 acre apple orchard. Every fall my dad and I would pick the apples and then take them to my aunt's house to store in her cellar. I'll never forget that smell of going down there to get a few Red Delicious a couple months later. The aroma of the apples and the cold chill is wonderful memory.

Norman Rockwell photo-realism?

Just fantastic.

Thank You, Shorpy...

...For my new seasonal desktop background! From the overgrown roses to great-grandpa's well-worn hat, this image is fantastic. A real slice of Americana.

Hybrid

I think the best thing is that their hands are together -- his liver-spotted and gnarled, hers plump and unable to even get around the apple all the way -- which doesn't stop her from taking it on. I love his amused, patient, loving smile.

Fantastic!

Such a beautiful pic! Thank you for sharing!

Lil Pumpkin

This has got to be one of my favorite pictures ever posted here. So many reasons to love it. Thank your friend for sharing!

October

Beautiful. Like something out of National Geographic. Or it could be calendar art.

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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