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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • UNFAIR TO BABIES, 1936

Bright-Eyed: 1915

Bright-Eyed: 1915

1915. "Dog show. Mrs. Henry C. Corbin." Another entry from H&E's series showing matrons, misses and their mutts at the Washington Kennel Club dog show of April 1915. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

Veiled Ladies

Closely wrapped veils on ladies' hats, some transparent, some not, were part of high fashion for upper class women when going out in public from at least the early 1890s until the beginning of the 1920s. In her 1952 memoir "Remember and Be Glad," Lady Cynthia Asquith (1887-1960) wrote of her dislike for the elaborate and uncomfortable fashions of her youth, and mentioned in particular the constricting hat veils "that caught even in my short eyelashes, and made seeing difficult."

Veils

In the 1950s, when I was a little girl, my mother's "dress up" outfit included small hats with short veils. Often the veils would have beads which made them sparkle. They didn't cover the eyes, but they came from the same source as the full veil. Most women wore veils in public way back when, they just got smaller and smaller until they disappeared, along with the hats.

Screening

Veils must have been big back then.

Bubi Schneerisschen

This series of dog show photos was evidently taken for the Washington Post, appearing on April 13, 1915. The caption identifies Mrs. Corbin's Pomeranian as "Bubi Schneerisschen."

Henry Corbin was Adjutant General of the United States Army. Widowed after the death of his first wife in 1894, he married Edyth Patten in 1901. Corbin retired from the Army in 1906 and built a palatial home, "Highwood," in Chevy Chase, MD. He died in 1909.

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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