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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • EAT MORE FISH, 1917

Hollywood Hills: 1960

Hollywood Hills: 1960

Los Angeles, 1960. "Case Study House No. 22. Stahl Residence, 1635 Woods Drive. Architect: Pierre Koenig." Color transparency by Julius Shulman. More to come on this house, which has achieved a measure of fame in the annals of modern architecture due a certain black-and-white photograph. View full size.

The Stahl House

Dave, sorry I can't adopt you, but I can let you know that the home will be available for tours in the coming weeks. The home is not open to visitors very often so this would a good opportunity for you to come take a look.

All the info is posted on the Facebook page, and a reservation is required.

Palm Springs

I can't be totally sure, I but I think the home used in "Mad Men" was this one.

Designed by E. Stewart Williams, the Palms Springs home was once owned by Frank Sinatra, and was also used in an episode of "Six Feet Under" (Brenda's parents' house).

Here's more on that house here.

The Stahl House

The Stahl House is very much alive and well.

I do not believe it is fair to say Julius Shulman is the only star here. This house would not be here today had it not been for two men. My father, C.H. "Buck" Stahl, who designed the original concept for the house, and Pierre Koenig, who was the architect with enough guts to take on the project. It took all three men to create this icon.

For more pictures of the house you can go to the home's website at www.stahlhouse.com. You can also see some more current picture at the Facebook Group "The Stahl House"

The house is still owned by the Stahl family.

Mark Stahl

[Very interesting, and thanks for writing. Oh, and will you adopt me? - Dave]

Mad House

I believe it was used in an episode of Mad Men this year. Adman Donald Draper walks away from a meeting while in L.A. and ends up with an assortment of jet-setters at a house that looks very much like this one. The story takes place in 1962.

Movie Shoot Site

There's the dream of any homeowner - a house that pays for itself.

A closeup view of Shulman

A good personal salute to Julius Shulman:

http://flickr.com/photos/25726169@N03/sets/72157607259679510/

Neutra House

The house in L.A. Confidential is the Lovell House by Richard Neutra.

The Stahl House is still there.

The real star here is Julius Shulman, whose photography helped popularize Modernist architecture.

Best House in a Leading Role

This house was featured in Smog, Nurse Betty, Why Do Fools Fall in Love, Galaxy Quest, and The Marrying Man to name a few. More here.

Last House on the Left

It has been in several movies according to this article.

Stahl House

Thanks Dave.

Wheels

And I wish we could see more of that nifty car parked on the left. Mercury?

[1957 Plymouth. - Dave]

Mullholland Drive

Isn't this the house seen in the movie Mullholland Drive, supposedly owned by the movie director "Adam Kessler"?

Gorgeous

Does this place still exist?

The Loved One

I'm sure I'm not the only one who's thinking about that.

 
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