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About the Photos

Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • FLY TO THE CARIBBEAN BY CLIPPER, c. 1950s

B.E.P.: 1929

B.E.P.: 1929

June 26, 1929. Washington, D.C. "Bureau of Engraving and Printing." Note the many mercury-discharge lamps. National Photo glass negative. View full size.

 

What do they see?

They all appear to be staring at something(one) out of frame right. The grim, almost scared look on several of their faces reminds me of an old Charles Addams cartoon.

A tint situation.

I'd bet the light those lamps threw out was a garish bluish-green. Not exactly stimulating.

Stained for life

You can always tell a printer by his fingers; witness the guy on the left.

Division of labor

Girls on the left, boys on the right. Libs and Neo-cons?

What are they printing?

Not money, but rather some kind of fairly large certificates, six per sheet of paper. Government bonds, perhaps?

The lady in the middle who's sitting directly behind the roller looks like the constant mechanical racket in the place has driven her right 'round the bend!

 
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Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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