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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • THE NEW ZEALAND FOREST, c. 1950

Holton-Arms Girls: 1925

Holton-Arms Girls: 1925

Washington, D.C., circa 1925. "Holton-Arms School, girls' basketball team." The bloomer-clad hoopsters of H-A. Harris & Ewing glass negative. View full size.

 

Numbers

You can still buy those house numbers today. I just picked some up at the hardware store to put on my alley fence.

RE: Champions

One has to wonder if Miss Madeira did some recruiting to obtain the services of Miss Francis Bethel "former Western High school star". Indeed, was "Francis" even a girl? This sports item must have been written by a Madeira fan: if Bethel's shooting was "the outstanding feature of the game" what was Miss Hoxton, chopped liver?

Champions

Love those headbands - very sporty!


Washington Post, Mar 16, 1924

School Court Title to Holton Arms Six

Holton Arms girls basketball team yesterday captured the private school championship of the District, defeating Miss Madeira school, 55-39, at the Holton gymnasium. The game was the deciding one in the series, as both teams were tied for top honors.

The accurate shooting of Miss Francis Bethel, former Western High school star, was the outstanding feature of the game. She scored the bulk of her team's points. Miss Hoxton, captain of the winning team, starred for Holton Arms.

Holton Arms Positions Miss Maderia Hoxton R.F. F. Bethel Alexandria L.F. G. Sunderland Davis Center Van Loon M. Seldon S.C. Serat Jones R.G. Smith Badgett L.G. Hitchcock
Floor goals - Bethel (12), Hoxton (19), Sunderland (3), Alexandria (3), Foul Goals - Bethel(8), Hoxton (9), Alexander (2).

Sunshine Squints

While pierced ears were common in the era before comfortable (endurable?) ear clips, a photographer who would pose a subject in full sunlight for a large format shot was not. Given the fussy work of composing this shot on ground glass, focusing, stopping down, inserting the film holder, pulling the dark slide and actually taking the shot, the ladies held up well during what must have been a trying experience.

Taking the shot in a shady spot with flash fill would have produced a much more natural team shot. As it is, the strain of holding a pose for an extended period shows.

[On a technical-semantic note, this picture was made on glass, not film. So no film holder. - Dave]

The Static Letter

Notice that the "A" on the blouse of the girl on the far right is held on with pins, while the one in the middle appears to be held on with nothing but static electricity that is rapidly failing. The others are probably just ironed on. Didn't anybody have mothers that sewed in those days?

Definitely a redhead

Third girl from right is definitely a redhead because she looks just like me! Yikes!

Who Sat?

Ladies' Basketball teams of that day consisted of six players: three forwards, three guards. So who was the bench warmer?

Holton Condominium

The school has been converted into Condos according to this realty website.

http://www.trulia.com/property/1053518056-2125-S-St-NW-Washington-DC-200...

I noticed it still has the original front door.

That's the whole point of public libraries

I've always used public libraries for personal and professional research, but a tip of the hat to anyone who can achieve notoriety and profit from them as well.

There are many thriving for-profit businesses that provide easier access to information that was originally produced or maintained by the government, but none has as many pictures of such cute girls.

2125 S Street

I guess that would be 2125 S Street, according to the Holton-Arms website. Anyone know what, if anything, is there now?


View Larger Map

Uh Oh! Redux

Haughty was the first thing that came to my mind.

And even in B&W, she looks like a redhead.

Censoring Comments

I've submitted several comments, non were offensive or rude. They've been ignored. Thanks. Now I know where you're coming from. Enjoy your notoriety and profit at the expense of Library of Congress (and the US taxpayer) while it lasts.

[See what you all have been missing? - Dave]

Stop...stop

I never realized just how fickle I am until you started posting these groups of young women ... I keep falling in love!!!

Here we go again.

Ok, I have dibs on number five from the left. I think she's trying to hypnotize me. And it's working.

Sporty

The eyelets on the hems of their blouses are a bit ... sailory, too. Just looks like so many clothes for basketball! I mean, they don't have to wear tanks and shorts, but tights!?

The headbands are QUITE something.

Uh Oh!

The third young lady from the right looks like trouble!

Their Letter

I just wonder if their letter "A" was scarlet and stood for "Angel". I know, I know... the "H" (on the other side of the jacket) is silent in this picture.

Also, the third girl from the left has pierced ears. I've not seen that in other girls from this era. Progressive in fashion or does the silent "H" really stand for "heretic"?

Fundamentals

I doubt they led the league in dunks. I also note that the school really liked the sailor's kerchief style.

 
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