The Shorpy Archive
 
6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
Join and Share

 
Social Shorpy

To love him is to like him. Our goal: 100k "likes":

 
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Syndicate content
Daily e-mail updates:

 
 
 
 
Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

WEB SITE & CONTENTS
© 2014 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
JUMP TO PAGE   100  >  200  >  300  >  400  >  500  >  600
VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • SHASTA-CASCADE WONDERLAND REGION

Roy F. Carty: 1919

Roy F. Carty: 1919

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. "Roy F. Carty." Chief draftsman for the Shipping Board during the war, Roy went into business for himself in 1919 at 1407 14th Street N.W. National Photo Company Collection glass negative. View full size.

 

How it might have looked in color II

One more try....

How it might have looked in color

I know I didn't get a lot of the colors right, but it was a very difficult photo to colorize and I just finally stopped trying to get it absolutely right. Hope you enjoy it anyway.

[Hmm. No image attached. In any case, probably a better place to submit something like that would be the Member Gallery -- first, register as a user and then upload your photo there. If you go to all the trouble of colorizing something and then posting it here as a comment, it can't be any wider than this relatively tiny box. ALSO: If you do post images to Comments please follow the instructions and use the "Preview" button to make sure your photo is not bigger than the box. - Dave]

Compliments to the photographer.

That's a really good photograph. The focus is razor-sharp throughout the entire depth of field, and he has even used the environment to solve his own "front-and-center" reflection problem. You can see the tripod legs reflected against the battery sign at the bottom of the window.

Whoever did this, knows his business.

Aerosol Paint Cans?

The cardboard tubes at the bottom of the window; that's what they look like. I suspect they may be a container for a type of heavy duty fuse?

[Ignition coils. - Dave]

I can spot em

I can spot a Coles Phillips illustration from across the street.

The lost tapes

The poster in the window appears to be affixed with scotch tape. Since it was not invented until 1930, it puts the photo date in question. Were there other types of cellophane tape in use in 1919?

[It's not "affixed" to anything. It's at least a foot back from the glass. The sign in the door is attached with adhesive or masking tape. Scotch Tape, a 3M brand, dates to the 1930s. - Dave]

Wrong Side of The Street

Re the Google Street View below. According to the DC Yellow Pages, the Hit Item store is 1406 14th St.

Auto Electrical Specialist

Washington Post, Aug 31, 1919

Along Realty Row

Throughout the war and the present days of the high cost of living, Roy F. Carty has drawn plans for many of the new ships added to Uncle Sam's merchant marine. Carty is the chief draftsman of the shipping board. Last week he tendered his resignation, to take effect September 8, when he will enter business for himself at a beautifully equipped office at 1407 Fourteenth street.


1920_roy_carty

Sometimes it's what what NOT there...

Where's the photographer's reflection? Even the buildings across the street are clearly seen.

[A wild hunch -- but maybe he's the guy in the hat standing next to the camera. - Dave]

The window ad

"Step In For Your Electrical Troubles" is a paste up. The image of the lady was done for a "Hole-Pruf" stocking magazine ad by the famous illustrator J.C. Lyendecker. Looks like they cleverly combined ther top of the hoisery ad with the text about electrical problems

Philadelphia Storage Battery Co.

Interesting technique on the battery sign. Painted letters backed up by an embossed metal surface to create a 3D perspective. Also interesting to see how "Philco" began as a trade name for a battery part, then turned into the company's name.

I heard...

...that some places roll up the sidewalks at night, looks like they padlock them during they day, too. Mind your step.

Still there

The building appears to be still be there, but stripped of that nice bay window and doors.

[As noted above, Roy's store was on the other side of the street. But you can see some of these buildings reflected in the window. - Dave]


View Larger Map

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

Syndicate content RSS | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Photo Use | © 2014 Shorpy Inc.