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Most of the photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs, 20 to 200 megabytes in size) from the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) Many were digitized by LOC contractors using a Sinar studio back. They are adjusted by your webmaster for contrast and color in Photoshop before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here.

 
 
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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • PAN AMERICAN TO GUATEMALA, 1938

Nickelodeon: 1909

Nickelodeon: 1909

Detroit, Michigan, circa 1909. "Princess Theatre." Nothing nicer anywhere! 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

 

Findings

Learned a new meaning (for me) of Findings. Thanks, Shorpy!

Humph!

The headless mannequin in Carron and Co. window doesn't seem to think much of the Princess!

Nothing Nicer Anywhere

An old postcard from the Princess. Which leads me to wonder, who sends postcards from theaters?

If I Had a Nickel

That seems to be the price of a good time back then, whether it be with a cigar or a movie.

Excuse me,

what was the name of the place again?

Oh my aching retinas.

With 6 arc lamps out front, 'Nothin Nicer Anywhere' would be up for debate after dark. But golly, that's a sweet little theater.

Fairly easy to date this photo.

"The Heroine of the Forge" and "The Castaways" (actual title), both Vitagraph products, were released on January 12, 1909. Pathe released "Elixir of Dreams" in the United States on March 22, 1909.

Nothing "spicier" anywhere

By the late 1960s, The Princess, at 98 Woodward Avenue, had morphed into the Empress Theater. This was a burlesque house that I visited on a number of occasions in my college years. By that time a renumbering had changed the address to 540 Woodward.

Especially the drama

Five-cent show going on all the time -- isn't that what family's for?

 
THE 100-YEAR-OLD PHOTO BLOG
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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