SHORPY Historic Photo Archive & Fine-Art Prints
 
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6000+ fine-art prints suitable for framing. Desk-size to sofa-size and larger, on archival paper or canvas.
 
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Member Photos


Photos submitted by Shorpy members.

 
Colorized Photos


Colorized photos submitted by members.

 
About the Photos

Our holdings include hundreds of glass and film negatives/transparencies that we've scanned ourselves; in addition, many other photos on this site were extracted from reference images (high-resolution tiffs) in the Library of Congress research archive. (To query the database click here.) They are adjusted, restored and reworked by your webmaster in accordance with his aesthetic sensibilities before being downsized and turned into the jpegs you see here. All of these images (including "derivative works") are protected by copyright laws of the United States and other jurisdictions and may not be sold, reproduced or otherwise used for commercial purposes without permission.

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© 2018 SHORPY INC.

[REV 25-NOV-2014]

 
 
 
NEW FROM THE VINTAGRAPH VAULTS • BUENOS AIRES, c. 1950

I Love a Parade: 1939

I Love a Parade: 1939

Ready to participate in the Labor Day parsde in Pekin, Illinois in 1939.

Cold Warriors: 1959

Cold Warriors: 1959

As part of some kind of civil service, RCA sent my father and other employees to Hammonton, New Jersey in June, 1959 to take a course in Heavy Rescue that was put on by the State of New Jersey Division of Civil Defense and Disaster Control. The back of this photo lists the names of each of these men and their jobs. One is Assistant Chief Ray Dobbs of the Collingswood Fire Company, two are foremen from RCA’s Camden, NJ plant. Tony DiMaggio (standing, far right) was with the Camden police. My father is on the bottom row, next to the last position, if you count the far left as the first. His normal attire was a suit and tie, definitely not coveralls and a hard hat. I can only assume the attire was borrowed for this training exercise because he never owned any clothes like that. View full size.

One in Every Crowd: early 1950's

One in Every Crowd: early 1950's

My father’s world was one of men in business suits back in a time when classified job ads specified if they wanted a man or a woman. If they said man, a woman could not apply. This group, who are holding certificates of some sort in their laps, seems to be the unsmiling graduates of something. Exactly what, I have no way to find out.

My father has hand-written all of their names on the back of the photo but I will bet you can spot him without me telling you where he is. My father is the one and only guy in this picture sporting a bow tie. View full size.

Dayton Youth Concert: 1949

Dayton Youth Concert: 1949

Youth concert held in Memorial Hall, Dayton, Ohio on May 5, 1949. My father was in the 7th or 8th grade at Jackson School and also a Boy Scout; he's sitting next to a Girl Scout (the foot of the microphone stand points to his right foot). The group was made up of students selected from all the public schools. My father is unable to remember the theme for this concert. View full size.

No Soap, No Girls: 1960

No Soap, No Girls: 1960

After the bathyscaphe Trieste descended to the deepest part of the ocean in January 1960, I made a "copy" out of cardboard boxes, cellophane and marker pens Dad brought home from work. That's me as a nine-year-old explorer at the window. View full size.

85 Leabrook Lane: 1964

85 Leabrook Lane: 1964

As I have said before, my mother was decidedly Mrs. Sewandsew. Along with making us matching RCA Picnic shirts in Princeton, she made matching red dresses for her, me, and a tiny one that was an exact replica of ours for my Barbie doll. These were not special occasion clothes. They had great big pockets with pointed tops (since she knew I would wear, and wear, and wear anything with a big pocket for me to stash stuff in) and were of a pattern she designed which she identified as princess line. And yes, the faux pearl beads, and medium heels were the way she dressed on a regular day. She did not have house dresses or cleaning house clothes.

Baby boomers will recognize the square object on the steps that you can see between me and my brother as a milk box. Each morning a man from a local dairy company delivered fresh milk to our house, using it.

Colonial Williamsburg: 1964

Colonial Williamsburg: 1964

On Labor Day Weekend, just before I started fifth grade, my parents took me on an educational vacation to Colonial Williamsburg. There we did the basic tourist things that one does in Williamsburg, including pose for pictures in the stocks. It was one of many times I and my mother wore the matching red dresses she had made. My brother did not go with us because he was too little. He was left with a family that my father knew from work.

Public Humiliation, Tourist Style: 1964

Public Humiliation, Tourist Style: 1964

Another shot from our Colonial Williamsburg vacation that took place on Labor Day Weekend 1964. In this case, my co-conspirator, being punished, with me, is my father.

 
SHORPY HISTORICAL PHOTO ARCHIVE
Shorpy.com | History in HD is a vintage photo archive featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1960s. (Available as fine-art prints from the Shorpy Archive.) The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.

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