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Buttermilk Junction: 1937

Buttermilk Junction: 1937

April 1937. "Buttermilk Junction, Martin County, Indiana." Fill 'er up with Ethyl and Acidophilus. Medium-format nitrate negative by Russell Lee. View full size.

 

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Rock-faced concrete block

If I'm not mistaken, the façade of what is undoubtedly a balloon-frame building is composed of "rock-faced" concrete block, which would date the structure's origin to no earlier time than 1900, when such block were first beginning to be introduced.

[Looks like sculptured tin siding. -tterrace]

McNab Store

I contacted the Martin County Historical Society, and here's what they found:

I did some research today on "Buttermilk Junction." As I stated before, we had never heard of it. I found an old photo in one of our books & it was called "The McNab Store" - now the site of Building 101 on the Crane Naval Depot. Our book does not mention it going by any other name.

Jane Marshall/Secretary
Martin Co. Historical Society

You won't find this spot

on a map today. I'm sure all existing buildings, etc. were bulldozed in about 1940/41 when the Crane Naval Base (actually, its predecessor, the Naval Ammunition Depot) was built here.

That first step

Watch out for that first step "It's a doozie"

LP Cover

Yazoo Records used this photo on the cover of a blues compilation LP, Lonesome Roads Blues. Interestingly, they used it for songs from the Mississippi Delta.

I'm not a structural engineer

but there isn't much holding up that porch roof and the three 2x4's being asked to do the job are looking a bit tired!

I don't know about you

but my bones denounce the buckboard bounce, and yes, the cactus does hurt my toes, but I don't see any here so I'll let that slide.

Deux Chaveux

The station wagon in the middle looks to be about two horsepower.

*Almost* everything

It still needs Percy Kilbride.

Linco Gasoline

Later absorbed by Marathon.

Buckboards

1880s version of the pickup truck -- "Hey I need to move some stuff, can I borrow your buckboard?"

This place has everything.

Horsedrawn wagon, combustion engines, gas and chickens. Would love to find this spot on a current map.

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