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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • JENNY ON THE JOB LIFTS WEIGHT THE EASY WAY

Mama's Family: 1936

Mama's Family: 1936

November 1936. "Depression refugee family from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Arrived in California June 1936. Mother and three half-grown children; no father." Photo by Dorothea Lange for the Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
Today’s Top 5

Save the rind!

The girl's smile that fascinated davidk might have something to do with the watermelon remnants behind her. Melons like that have a way of making any circumstance a bit more joyful.

Talk about guts.

When you see what that family had to endure it puts your own problems in perspective. Those kids had to grow up very quickly and do all they could to help their mom without a dad present. I hope everyone in that family ended up living a good life.

That Plank

Gives new meaning to the term "running board."

Not today

Can't imagine doing this today with all the rules and regulations that are in place. While times were tough people looked at things differently then we do today.

Sparse spare

I hope they're not counting on that spare on the roof of the car! It looks like it's seen better days.

Vehicle ID

vehicle appears to be a Dodge Brothers, looks like a DB on hubcap.

Jackpot

This photo covers practically all the bases: evocative subject matter, ancient cars (including blurred car in motion for extra identification challenge, plus tantalizing fragment of third car), various elements in puzzles to be assembled (e.g. stovepipes for tent home), trademark names (Seiberling), food and packaging to be identified, telegraph wires with asymmetrical crossarms, railway signal, modes of customization (e.g. boards and ropes holding in possessions), mystery objects, initials or logo in hub of wheel to be deciphered…

But what gets me most? The girl’s smile.

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