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VINTAGRAPH • WPA • WWII • POUR IT ON: WWII POSTER

Gray Acres: 1937

Gray Acres: 1937

October 1937. "Family of Joe Kramer, farmer near Williston, North Dakota." Photo by Russell Lee for the Resettlement Administration. View full size.

 

On Shorpy:
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The girl's wrist band

It isn't there for looks. Lee took another photo of the little girl inside the home, and the caption reads, "Daughter of farmer near Williston, North Dakota. Dwarfed arm probably due to infantile paralysis."

Hunger-inspiring

Wonder if author Suzanne Collins saw this photo before writing "Hunger Games"... our girl on the end is the perfect inspiration for heroine Katniss, right down to the leather archer's wrist brace and defiant gleam in her eye.

Count Our Blessings

Wow, these parents look to be in their 60s! Yet are obviously much younger. Life must have been very difficult for this poor family, so typical of other vintage photos.

Shorpy certainly does make us count our blessings and realize how fortunate we are now living in this 21 Century!

Previously on Shorpy

here:

https://www.shorpy.com/node/15610

These would likely be Joe Kramer, age about 46, originally from Germany; his wife Emma, also about 46, originally from Michigan. The children are probably daughter Florence, aged about 9, Floyd (age 6) and Lawrence (11). Son Clarence (17) not shown. All living in Williams County, North Dakota, at the time of the 1940 U.S. Census.

What a Difference 76 Years Makes

Today in the oil boom town of Williston, this fella could make $100,000/year working in the oil fields.

Golly Beav

Remember the episode where Beaver tried to cut his own hair?
This must be where they sent him until it grew out.

Hope Joe got the mineral rights,

if so, his heirs must be truly enjoying the current oil boom centered around Williston.

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